More snow may be coming, but the end may be in sight

Many have begged fruitlessly to the uncaring gods for the arrival of spring in the Southeast.

Snowfall in Juneau is expected to largely taper off this weekend, replaced by warmer temperatures, said National Weather Service meteorologists. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

Snowfall in Juneau is expected to largely taper off this weekend, replaced by warmer temperatures, said National Weather Service meteorologists. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

A streak of weather that has many Juneau residents exasperated by the April snowfall may wrap up next week with a warmer spell of days.

“Early Sunday, it looks like we have some clouds and some light snow,” said Brian Bezenek, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service here in Juneau, in a phone interview. “We have another weather system trying to push across the Gulf on Sunday into Sunday night. It should be going to rain by Monday when the main front gets in.”

Snowfall broke records on Thursday around the region, and might do so again for Friday when the results for snowfall are tabulated, Bezenek said. And the signs for the rest of the month are cautiously promising.

Snowfall in Juneau is expected to largely taper off this weekend, replaced by warmer temperatures, said National Weather Service meteorologists. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

Snowfall in Juneau is expected to largely taper off this weekend, replaced by warmer temperatures, said National Weather Service meteorologists. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)

“The overall trend is getting warmer next week. National says, for the 6-10 day outlook, temperatures above normal and precipitation below normal,” Bezenek said. “That is just an outlook, it doesn’t always follow the trend. But it looks like we might be heading in the right direction.”

March had a formidable amount of snow, Bezenek said, with more than 33 inches of recorded snowfall. But it’s not enough to break the 2007 record of more than 62 inches of snow.

Eaglecrest recently cracked 500 inches of snow this season, said the ski area’s marketing manager in a news release. (Courtesy photo / Charlie Herrington)

Eaglecrest recently cracked 500 inches of snow this season, said the ski area’s marketing manager in a news release. (Courtesy photo / Charlie Herrington)

At least one segment of town probably doesn’t mind the snow. Eaglecrest Ski Area recently cleared 500 inches of snow this season, according to a news release from Charlie Herrington, marketing director for the ski area.

“500” might not sound newsworthy compared to some PNW & Utah ski resorts, but it’s pretty huge for us,” Herrington said in the release. “This much snowfall has only happened once before in recorded history when Eaglecrest had 640” in 2011-2012. Although this is a historic season for Eaglecrest, even an average winter (320”) is punctuated by consistent, incremental snowfall accumulation and refreshed powder day after day.”

Eaglecrest will terminate operations for the season after April 18, if the good weather continues, or before that if conditions deteriorate. Eaglecrest had extended the season to accommodate continued snowfall, but will not have sufficient staff for legal and insurance requirements of running the chairlifts, and will not be extending the season further, Herrington said.

This year’s Slush Cup is also canceled.

• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at (757) 621-1197 or mlockett@juneauempire.com.

The Southeast had record snowfall for April 8, according the National Weather Service. (Courtesy art / NWS)

The Southeast had record snowfall for April 8, according the National Weather Service. (Courtesy art / NWS)

More in News

Police don’t believe the driver of a vehicle that a man injured himself while exiting was aware the man had injured himself, said a police spokesperson in a news release. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police: Man injured Saturday willingly exited moving vehicle

The driver cooperated fully and there are no more charges forthcoming.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the virus that causes COVID-19. Monoclonal antibodies may be a good treatment option for some people who test positive for the illness, according to state health officials. However, vaccination remains the best tool for limiting spread of COVID-19 and limiting hospitalizations. (NIAID-RML via AP, File)
COVID at a glance for Wednesday, Oct. 28

The latest local and state numbers.

Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File 
Michelle Ward and Anthony Davidson walk their children, Kyesin, 6, left, CJ, 5, center, and Callen, 2, down Seward Street as they visit downtown merchants for Halloween 2018. This year, downtown businesses are taking a pass on trick-or-treating. However, options for spooky fun and treat gathering abound.
Thrills and chills on tap for the capital city

Everything you need for your Halloween calendar

Snow and rain are often annoying, but without the right amounts, rivers become too low for good floats and salmon spawning. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
I Went to the Woods: The two types of climate change

It’s about reusable water bottles, but also energy efficient homes.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the virus that causes COVID-19. Monoclonal antibodies may be a good treatment option for some people who test positive for the illness, according to state health officials. However, vaccination remains the best tool for limiting spread of COVID-19 and limiting hospitalizations. (NIAID-RML via AP, File)
COVID at a glance for Tuesday, Oct. 26

The latest local and state numbers.

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Tuesday, Oct. 26

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the virus that causes COVID-19. Monoclonal antibodies may be a good treatment option for some people who test positive for the illness, according to state health officials. However, vaccination remains the best tool for limiting spread of COVID-19 and limiting hospitalizations. (NIAID-RML via AP, File)
COVID at a glance for Monday, Oct. 25

The latest local and state numbers.

Most Read