Colleen Torrence and Kathryn Kurtz raise their voices in mock terror during rehearsal for “Godzilla Eats Las Vegas.” (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Colleen Torrence and Kathryn Kurtz raise their voices in mock terror during rehearsal for “Godzilla Eats Las Vegas.” (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Godzilla is coming to Juneau: Local ensemble preps for special Halloween themed concert

Let’s boo-gie

Juneau Community Bands is about to put their stamp on Godzilla’s stomp.

Juneau Community Bands’ Taku Winds ensemble is preparing to host its first-ever Halloween Family Concert this coming Saturday afternoon at the Juneau Arts & Culture Center. The concert will feature an array of spooky and fun Halloween-themed songs including “Godzilla Eats Las Vegas,” a live music ridealong of a video depicting, you guessed it, Godzilla eating Las Vegas.

photos by Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire
Danielle Koch raises her voice during rehearsal for “Godzilla Eats Las Vegas.” The piece includes a number of vocalized moments, and it will be performed along a video that shows the King of All Monsters terrorizing Sin City.

photos by Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire Danielle Koch raises her voice during rehearsal for “Godzilla Eats Las Vegas.” The piece includes a number of vocalized moments, and it will be performed along a video that shows the King of All Monsters terrorizing Sin City.

Sarah McNair-Grove, president of the Juneau Community Bands, said Taku Winds has had a blast practicing all the pieces, and said hosting a special Hallowewen themed concert has always been something the band has wanted to do, and are now excited to see it almost here.

“It’s kind of silly, but a lot of fun,” she said. “We’ve had so much fun practicing it — it’s going to be great.”

Elizabeth Salazar simulates the foreboding whistling sound of a descending bomb. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Elizabeth Salazar simulates the foreboding whistling sound of a descending bomb. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

McNair-Grove said this year’s Taku Winds ensemble is composed of around 35 people that will be playing at the concert, most of which are adult players along with a few high schoolers as well. She said the ensemble is quite a bit bigger than previous years, which she said is great for the type of music they will be playing at the concert Saturday.

[More information on other local haunts]

McNair-Grove said the event will be a great way for residents to kickstart their Halloween festivities, and get in a spooky spirit., and nourishes people to come in their costumes.

Sarah McNair-Grove laughs during a rehearsal for the upcoming Juneau Community Bands’ concert. The performance will include screening a short film depicting Godzilla destroying Las Vegas. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Sarah McNair-Grove laughs during a rehearsal for the upcoming Juneau Community Bands’ concert. The performance will include screening a short film depicting Godzilla destroying Las Vegas. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

“It’s got great music, it’s a great chance to dress up and wear your Halloween costume and it gives you a chance to see your friends and neighbors on stage showing off their wonderful talents,” McNair-Grove said.

• Contact reporter Clarise Larson at clarise.larson@juneauempire.com or (651)-528-1807. Follow her on Twitter at @clariselarson.

Know & Go

What: Taku Wind’s Halloween Family Concert

Where: Juneau Arts & Culture Center, 350 Whittier St.

Admission: $5 Students; $15 Seniors; $20 General. $35 Family (parents and children living in the same household) tickets can be purchased online at https://jahc.na.ticketsearch.com/sales/salesevent/14085

When: 3:00 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29

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