People mill outside the Glory Hall on South Franklin Street on Wednesday, Oct. 7. The Glory Hall was one of four organizations in Juneau to jointly receive nearly $1 million in grant funding from the Alaska Housing Financial Corporation. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

People mill outside the Glory Hall on South Franklin Street on Wednesday, Oct. 7. The Glory Hall was one of four organizations in Juneau to jointly receive nearly $1 million in grant funding from the Alaska Housing Financial Corporation. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

Four Juneau nonprofits receive grant aimed at curbing homelessness

The four organizations received nearly $1 million in grant funding.

Four Juneau nonprofit organizations jointly received nearly a million dollars in grant money from the Alaska Housing Financial Corporation to combat homelessness amid the pandemic.

“It’s important that there’s the support of the community for these dollars to have the greatest impact for the community,” said Stacy Barnes, AHFC spokesperson, in a phone interview. “There are people who may be experiencing hardship for the very first time. We want to help those individuals to stay on track.”

The Glory Hall, Gastineau Human Services Corporation, Family Promise of Juneau, and the Alaska Housing Development submitted a joint application for grant funding to the AHFC in November, Barnes said. The $868,230 grant, part of the CARES Act emergency solutions grant for the coronavirus pandemic, is specifically meant to help prevent those affected by the pandemic from experiencing homelessness. Figuring out one’s options during this time can be confusing, Barnes said.

“They may have never received this kind of help before,” Barnes said. “Trying to navigate can be difficult for sure.”

[Bus drives off road, lands on roof of home]

The joint grant was spearheaded by GHS executive director Mike Pellerin, said Glory Hall executive director Mariya Lovishchuk in a phone interview. While there is a yearly grant that these organizations apply for, the CARES Act funding is new as the government tries to address fallout from the coronavirus. The AHFC received $5 million in federal funding to help cover all the regions of Alaska besides Anchorage, which received specific funding separately, Barnes said.

“Mike Pellerin wrote the grant. He put the grant together and got all the supporting materials,” Lovishchuk said in a phone interview. “We get this grant on an annual basis. Mike always manages the grant and puts it together. He’s been doing it for many, many years.”

Family Promise of Juneau joined the group applying jointly for the coronavirus, Barnes said. Juneau was one of seven areas that applied for grant funding. Each region was capped at $1 million, Barnes said. Barnes said they looked specifically for programs that had broad popular support and follow-through with clients. City and Borough of Juneau submitted a recommendation that the grants for these programs was approved, Barnes said.

“The money will help go towards helping with the increased staffing, rental of the extra space, and the appropriate PPE for staff as well as cleaning supplies,” Lovishchuk said. “All the things we need to operate during COVID for two different buildings.”

Across Alaska, Barnes said, the average loss of income felt by applicants who applied for help with rent or mortgages was about $22,000. “Because of COVID, we used to have one staff per shift. Now we have three staff per shift,” Lovishchuk said. “The other big concern is what will happen if we have to start making meals again instead of being able to rely on volunteers. There’s also all the additional cleaning that has to happen.”

The grant also doesn’t come with a requirement to be spent by the end of of December, Lovishchuk said, which allows recipients to hold some funds in reserve against possible future needs, such as hotel rooms if community spread takes off again.

“The big question in everyone’s mind is what is Congress going to do?” Barnes said. “There’s financial hardship across the state and across the nation as a result of this pandemic.”

• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at (757) 621-1197 or mlockett@juneauempire.com.

More in News

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Friday, Jan. 22

The most recent state and local numbers.

A Coast Guard Station Juneau 45-foot Response Boat-Medium patrols Auke Bay during an exercise in 2018. A response boat similar to the one in the photo was struck by a laser near Ketchikan on Saturday, Jan. 17, prompting an investigation into the crime. (Lt. Brian Dykens / U.S. Coast Guard)
Coast Guard wants information after laser pointed at boat

“Laser strikes jeopardize the safety of our boat crews…”

The valleys of Jim River and Prospect Creek in northern Alaska, where an official thermometer registered Alaska’s all-time low of minus 80 degrees F on Jan. 23, 1971. Photo by Ned Rozell
Alaska’s all-time cold record turns 50

The camp was there to house workers building the trans-Alaska pipeline

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Thursday, Jan. 21

The most recent state and local numbers.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy addresses the public during a virtual town hall on Sept. 15, 2020 in Alaska. ( Courtesy Photo / Austin McDaniel, Office of the Governor)
Dunleavy pitches dividend change amid legislative splits

No clear direction has emerged from lawmakers.

Joar Leifseth Ulsom, right, wearing a bib with ExxonMobil lettering on it, congratulates Peter Kaiser on his win in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska. The world’s most famous sled dog race has lost another major sponsor as the Iditarod prepares for a scaled-back version of this year’s race because of the pandemic, officials said Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021. ExxonMobil confirmed to The Associated Press that the oil giant will drop its sponsorship of the race. (Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News)
ExxonMobil becomes latest sponsor to sever Iditarod ties

The world’s most famous sled dog race has lost another major sponsor.

Has it always been a police car? (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire)
Police calls for Friday, Jan. 22, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This electron microscope image made available and color-enhanced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Integrated Research Facility in Fort Detrick, Md., shows Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, orange, isolated from a patient.	(THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-NIAID/National Institutes of Health)
State reports 24 COVID-19 deaths

Only 1 of the deaths happened recently, according to the state.

Most Read