This Friday, March 18 photo shows an Air Force C-17 at Juneau International Airport as it ferried gear to Juneau for a hazardous materials exercise with the city and other organizations. (David Rigas / Juneau Empire)

This Friday, March 18 photo shows an Air Force C-17 at Juneau International Airport as it ferried gear to Juneau for a hazardous materials exercise with the city and other organizations. (David Rigas / Juneau Empire)

City and military hold hazardous material exercise

The exercise will test the city’s response to a hazmat emergency.

Juneau residents may witness military and emergency personnel carrying out a multi-day hazardous materials exercise running through Wednesday evening.

Residents should not be concerned, said Assistant Chief Ed Quinto of Capital City Fire/Rescue.

“Military is here. The FBI is here. The Coast Guard is playing, the police and the fire department are playing,” Quinto said in a phone interview. “The fire department will be there with our fire trucks, ambulances and equipment. But we will continue to operate as a fire department.”

[Military wraps up major cold-weather exercise]

The exercise is unrelated to Arctic Edge 2022, which had participating units operating in Juneau and was focused on defense of the homeland. The current exercise is designed to reinforce training to deal with hazardous material emergencies, according to the City and Borough of Juneau.

Military personnel from around the country began arriving over the weekend in military transport aircraft, Quinto said. Personnel are coming from the Lower 48 to participate in the exercise. During the course of the exercise, residents may see military and city personnel in hazmat suits taking part in the simulations.

“It’s mostly geared toward how to handle hazardous material. We’re part of the statewide 104 teams,” Quinto said. “They want to practice our teams in dealing with hazmat. For big incidents we can’t handle, we call in the military or the civil support teams.”

The exercise will test both the city’s teams, as well as how the lines of communication work for larger hazmat incidents. The Juneau International Airport, CCFR’s Hagevig Fire Training Center, and other locations will be used for the simulations, Quinto said.

“There will be multiple venues,” Quinto said. “They were setting things up for the scenario all week.”

CCFR’s hazmat team, as well as the department at large, will participate in the exercises, as well as simulating scaling up the size of the response and involving the National Guard’s civil support teams and the FBI.

“Some of the scenarios, we’ll be using our sensors or gearing up in our personnel protective equipment and putting our policies into play,” Quinto said. “We want to make sure we identify the weaknesses in our team so we can improve them further on.”

• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at (757) 621-1197 or mlockett@juneauempire.com.

More in News

Jasmine Chavez, a crew member aboard the Quantum of the Seas cruise ship, waves to her family during a cell phone conversation after disembarking from the ship at Marine Park on May 10. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
Ships in port for the week of May 25

Here’s what to expect this week.

The LeConte state ferry departs Juneau on Tuesday afternoon, bound for Haines on a special round-trip following two cancelled sailings due to a mechanical problem. (Laurie Craig / Juneau Empire)
LeConte returns to service with special trip to Haines after weekend cancellation

State ferry will pick up half of nearly 60 stranded vehicles, others may have to wait until July.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Monday, May 27, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Anchorage pullers arrived at Wrangell’s Petroglyph Beach on May 23 for a canoe-naming ceremony. One of the canoes they will paddle to Juneau was dedicated to Wrangell’s Marge Byrd, Kiks.adi matriarch Shaawat Shoogoo. The canoe’s name is Xíxch’ dexí (Frog Backbone). (Becca Clark / Wrangell Sentinel)
Canoes making 150-mile journey from Wrangell, other Southeast communities to Celebration

Paddlers expected to arrive in Juneau on June 4, one day before biennial Alaska Native gathering.

The Alaska State Capitol and Dimond Courthouse are seen on Thursday morning, Jan. 18. (James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
Judicial Council recommends Alaskans keep all judges, including figure behind correspondence ruling

The Alaska Judicial Council has voted to recommend that state voters retain… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Sunday, May 26, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Saturday, May 25, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Friday, May 24, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Wreath bearers present wreaths for fallen comrades, brothers and sisters in arms during a Memorial Day ceremony at Alaskan Memorial Park on Monday. Laying wreaths on the graves of fallen heroes is a way to honor and remember the sacrifices made. (Jasz Garrett / Juneau Empire)
Traditional Memorial Day ceremonies offer new ways to ‘never forget’ those who served

New installations at memorial sites, fresh words of reminder shared by hundreds gathering in Juneau.

Most Read