The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska announced Thursday it will use the software Everbridge Emergency Notification System, which reaches multiple platforms, to send emergency notifications to tribal citizens that may be at risk during a critical event. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska announced Thursday it will use the software Everbridge Emergency Notification System, which reaches multiple platforms, to send emergency notifications to tribal citizens that may be at risk during a critical event. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

Tlingit and Haida launches emergency response platform for tribal citizens

It will allow tribal officials to send safety notifications to citizens across multiple platforms

The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska announced it’s launching a program that will allow tribal officials to send emergency notifications — among other types of notifications — across multiple platforms to tribal citizens that may be at risk during a critical event.

“It lets people know what is happening, where it’s happening, and gives advice on what to do and what not to do,” said Jason Wilson, public safety director during the live video.

The software launch was announced during a Facebook Live video event Thursday afternoon which accumulated more than 400 views during the hour-long lunchtime chat, Tlingit and Haida President Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson and other officials from the tribe’s Public Safety Division discussed how the software will work, and how citizens can utilize it across platforms.

“It’s going to allow us to have very quick and direct communication with our tribal citizens,” said Sabrina Boone, emergency operations coordinator for Tlingit and Haida. “It’s going to really streamline our response by mass communication and receive information back from our citizens.

She said the software, known as the Everbridge Emergency Notification System, can be downloaded as an app on a mobile phone, allows the public safety division to be able to send out messages via text, email, voice calls and numerous other digital platforms as well. Through the software, the public safety division will also be able to partner with the Coast Guard, Federal Emergency Management Agency and other emergency response services as well.

Some of the types of messages that could be sent — as outlined in the presentation — are weather, fire, roadway damage, active shooter alerts or any other emergency alerts that would be pertinent to tribal citizens who are in the director or surrounding areas at risk.

She said it will dial into specific needs in the Tlingit and Haida tribal community, including aiding its ability to monitor critical events, alert the community and coordinate response across platforms which is “paramount to public safety.”

It also has a map feature which shows “nearly real time” visual updates to “to be able to see what is going on throughout the world — it’s not just focused in Alaska or the U.S.,” Boone said.

Stephanie Nylen, program compliance coordinator for Tlingit and Haida, said the public safety division would also like to look into the possibility of sending out notifications for tribal Assembly updates and election information as those dates grow closer.

“Those types of announcements would be amazing,” Nylen said.

Boone said the way to get registered for this software is an “easy and quick” process for tribal citizens, who will already be added to the system and be able to access the information as long as they are up to date in their program compliance (tribal enrollment). A registration email will be sent out as well for citizens before the launch, according to Boone.

“It’s really flexing our sovereignty,” she said. “We can really push out notifications on our own terms.”

Wilson said the software has been in the works for a while, and said the Public safety division has been looking into something like it since the start of COVID-19. He said the launch is just the start of a bigger picture for the tribe to reach out to more members to be able to communicate throughout the community.

Peterson said for now, the software will mainly be targeted to aid enrolled tribal citizens but he said he hopes it will be used as a tool “beyond and reach other groups — that’s something I hope to see.”

• Contact reporter Clarise Larson at clarise.larson@juneauempire.com or (651)-528-1807. Follow her on Twitter at @clariselarson.

More in News

The Aurora Borealis glows over the Mendenhall Glacier in 2014. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Aurora forecast

Forecasts from the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute for the week of Jan. 22

David Holmes digs through a pile of boardgames during Platypus Gaming’s two-day mini-con over the weekend at Douglas Public Library and Sunday at Mendenhall Public Library. (Jonson Kuhn / Juneau Empire)
Good times keep rolling with Platypus Gaming

Two-day mini-con held at Juneau Public Library.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police calls for Saturday, Jan. 28, 2023

This report contains information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Juneau man indicted on child pornography charges

A Juneau man was indicted Thursday on charges of possessing or accessing… Continue reading

Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire 
Juneau’s municipal and state legislative members, their staff, and city lobbyists gather in the Assembly chambers Thursday meeting for an overview of how the Alaska State Legislature and politicians in Washington, D.C., are affecting local issues.
Local leaders, lawmakers and lobbyists discuss political plans for coming year

Morning meeting looks at local impact of state, national political climates.

This photo shows pills police say were seized after a suspicious package was searched. (Juneau Police Department)
Police: 1,000 fentanyl pills, 86 grams of meth seized

Juneau man arrested on felony charges.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police calls for Friday, Jan. 27, 2023

This report contains information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Captain Anne Wilcock recieves the Emery Valentine Leadership Award at the 2022 CCFR awards banquet on Saturday, Jan. 14. (Courtesy Photo / CCFR)
CCFR honors responders during annual banquet

Capital City Fire/Rescue hosted its 2022 awards banquet earlier this month as… Continue reading

A resident and his dog walk past the taped off portion of the Basin Road Trestle after it suffered damaged from a rockslide earlier this week. The trestle is open to pedestrians, but will remain closed to vehicular traffic until structural repairs are made, according to city officials. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)
Rocky road: Basin Road Trestle open to pedestrians, remains closed to vehicles

City officials say repairs are currently being assessed after damaging rockfall

Most Read