The Tongass National Forest is the largest national forest in the United States at 17 million acres. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)                                 The Tongass National Forest is the largest national forest in the United States at 17 million acres. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

The Tongass National Forest is the largest national forest in the United States at 17 million acres. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File) The Tongass National Forest is the largest national forest in the United States at 17 million acres. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Prince of Wales wolf hunt numbers set

Once feared endangered, wolf numbers on fourth-largest U.S. island have rebounded

Wildlife managers have set a harvest number for this year’s wolf hunt on Prince of Wales Island.

Biologists with the Alaska Department of Fish & Game and the U.S. Forest Service announced Friday that hunters will be allowed to hunt and trap 45 wolves on Prince of Wales and associated islands this fall and winter hunting season.

Wolves on Prince of Wales are known as Alexander Archipelago wolves and were once feared endangered. Numbers had dropped to just 89 animals in 2014, leading environmental groups to lobby for their protection under the Endangered Species Act. That idea was shot down in 2016 after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determined the isolated population of wolves are not genetically distinct from mainland wolves.

Wolf numbers on the island have recovered since then. In 2016, wildlife managers estimated that 231 wolves lived on the island. The most current population estimate puts that number at 225 wolves, managers say.

[A predator and a pedestal]

Numbers are up so high that subsistence hunters on the island worry that wolves are killing too many deer. As much as 20 percent of those wolves are up for harvest, and local hunters lobbied last year to increase that number to 30 percent of the population. A federal game board turned that idea down in May.

Wolf populations on Prince of Wales and associated islands, known as Game Management Unit 2, are hard to pin down, managers say. Prince of Wales is the fourth-largest island in the U.S. Much of it is covered by dense forest, making aerial surveys impractical.

Managers instead started use fur samples caught with barbed wire snares to analyze wolf DNA, analyzing the samples with statistical models to estimate populations, according to ADF&G.

This year’s quota was based on data collected through December of 2017. Results of the last two years of population studies suggested that rapid population growth on the island has stabilized, managers say.

Credible reports of unreported human-caused wolf deaths will also be counted toward this year’s harvest quota.

The Alaska Board of Game meets in Petersburg in January, 2019, affording an opportunity for hunters to again change how GMU 2 wolves are managed. Fish and Game has submitted a proposal to eliminate percentage-based management, opting instead to manage wolves on the island based on a population size, where more wolves would be harvested if the population rises above a set number.

The Craig Fish and Game Advisory Committee has also proposed extending the Unit 2 trapping season.

Wolf hunting season for federally-qualified subsistence hunters on federal lands opened Sept. 1 in Unit 2, and trapping for those hunters will open Nov. 15.

State wolf hunting and trapping seasons in Unit 2 open on Dec. 1.


• Contact reporter Kevin Gullufsen at 523-2228 and kgullufsen@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @KevinGullufsen.


More in News

Jasmine Chavez, a crew member aboard the Quantum of the Seas cruise ship, waves to her family during a cell phone conversation after disembarking from the ship at Marine Park on May 10. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
Ships in port for the week of May 18

Here’s what to expect this week.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Tuesday, May 21, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

A Shell station in Anchorage. (Nathaniel Herz/Northern Journal)
Shell abandons North Slope oil leases, raising questions about the industry’s future in Alaska

Experts say some of the state’s hard-to-tap oil prospects are becoming less attractive.

Tom Abbas discusses the hose his boat needs as shop owner and vintage halibut jacket provider Jim Geraghty shows his customer the options. Racks of dry-cleaned woolen jackets hang among the marine supply aisles in Gerahgty’s Lemon Creek business. (Laurie Craig / Juneau Empire)
Coats of many colors: Halibut jackets make a big splash again

“Pre-owned” wool garments from many decades ago being tracked down for resale by Juneau marine shop.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Monday, May 20, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

The Columbia state ferry sails through Lynn Canal on Monday, April 29, 2019. (Alex McCarthy / Juneau Empire file photo)
Columbia ferry out of service until end of the year

51-year-old ship has been out of service since November; corrosion in fire system cited for delay.

Jennifer Brown plays the drum while Jarrell Williams dances at an MMIP rally on the Alaska State Capitol steps on May 5. (Claire Stremple/Alaska Beacon)
Alaska lawmakers approve additional support for addressing missing and murdered Indigenous people

Cultural training for law enforcement officers and dedicated MMIP investigators among updates.

Rep. Sara Hannan (left) and Rep. Andi Story, both Juneau Democrats, talk during a break in floor debate Sunday, May 12, at the Alaska State Capitol. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Juneau’s legislative delegation reflects on lots of small items with big impacts passed during session

Public radio for remote communities, merit scholarships, fishing loans among lower-profile successes

Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks about his vision for Alaska’s energy future at the Connecting the Arctic conference held in Anchorage on Monday. Next to him is Alberta Premier Danielle Smith, invited to Anchorage to speak at this week’s Alaska Sustainable Energy Conference. (Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)
Gov. Dunleavy examining energy bills passed by Alaska Legislature

Expresses optimism about carbon storage bill, pondering next steps on royalty relief that failed.

Most Read