Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire 
The Norwegian Sun was still moored in Juneau on Monday after striking ice Saturday afternoon near Yakutat Bay on its way to Skagway.

Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire The Norwegian Sun was still moored in Juneau on Monday after striking ice Saturday afternoon near Yakutat Bay on its way to Skagway.

Update: Cruise ship that struck iceberg departs Juneau

It’s heading to Seattle for repairs.

This article has been updated to include new information.

After spending more than a day unexpectedly ported in Juneau after striking ice over the weekend, a damaged cruise ship is making its way back to Seattle.

The Norwegian Sun struck ice on its passage by Hubbard Glacier near Yakutat Bay on Saturday afternoon, requiring the ship to reroute to Juneau instead of its original destination in Skagway. The ship remained at the Franklin Dock while it underwent inspections by divers where it was determined to have sustained damage, according to Petty Officer 1st Class Nate Littlejohn, a Coast Guard public affairs specialist.

However, the repairs it requires must be done in Seattle, and “there is confidence” that the ship will be able to make it safely back to Seattle and receive repairs there.

“The whole boat came to a complete stop from the impact. It was a scary experience,” Alicia Amador, a passenger aboard the ship, told the Empire.

Amador, along with her six family members, traveled from Phoenix to Seattle to board the Norwegian Sun for a family vacation — which had been postponed three years due to the pandemic.

She described the initial experience as hearing a “big noise,” and then the ship moving as if something had hit it. She described the iceberg as the “size of a semi-truck.” Afterward, she and the other passengers were told that the ship was being rerouted to Juneau.

According to Littlejohn, after striking the iceberg, the ship called the Coast Guard’s Juneau command center to report the incident. They were told that the ship did not appear to cause any pollution or have any effect on the ballast, but it was decided to reroute to Juneau to have the hull inspected by divers.

The ship did not request any search and rescue assistance, and did not report any injuries to the Coast Guard, said Littlejohn.

Upon the arrival in Juneau on Sunday evening, Amador said passengers were able to leave the ship for a few hours. After, passengers and crew were told they would be able to leave the ship Monday morning. But, the ship did not leave the port until Monday afternoon, and is heading back to Seattle instead of continuing to its next destinations.

Amador said she and her family were very worried while waiting on the ship throughout Monday, as she and her family were not being given much information by cruise line employees. But, in the afternoon she was told that the remainder of her trip was canceled and the ship would arrive in Seattle Thursday morning. She said her family will receive a reimbursement for the remainder of their trip.

Norwegian Cruise Line did not immediately return messages seeking comment.

Contact reporter Clarise Larson at clarise.larson@juneauempire.com or at (651)-528-1807. Follow her on Twitter at @clariselarson.

More in News

A Princess Cruise Line ship is docked in Juneau on Aug. 25, 2021. (Michael Lockett / Juneau Empire File)
Ships in Port for the week of Aug. 7

Here’s what to expect this week.

From left, Kelsey Dean, watershed scientist with the Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition, and Kaagwaan Eesh Manuel Rose-Bell of Keex’ Kwáan watch as crew members set up tools to drag a log into place. Healthy salmon habitat requires woody debris, typically provided by falling branches and trees, which helps create deep salmon pools and varied stream structure. (Courtesy Photos / Mary Catharine Martin)
 
The SalmonState: Bringing the sockeye home

Klawock Indigenous Stewards and partners are working to a once prolific sockeye salmon run.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police ID man missing from cruise ship

Coast Guard suspends search efforts

(Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Saturday, Aug. 10, 2022

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

A northern oriole used dietary carotenoids to make its feathers bright orange. (Courtesy Photo / J. S. Willson)
On the Trails: The colorful world of birds

Colors are produced by cell structure, which can scatter light rays, making… Continue reading

(Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Saturday, Aug. 9, 2022

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Ice fog, a phrase in Russell Tabbert’s Dictionary of Alaskan English, is not uttered in many other places because to form it takes a sustained temperature of minus 35 F. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Alaska Science Forum: Alaska lexicon sinks in over the years

When my little Ford pickup chugged into Alaska 36 years ago this… Continue reading

Mimi Israelah, center, cheers for Donald Trump inside the Alaska Airlines Center in Anchorage, Alaska, during a rally Saturday July 9, 2022. Two Anchorage police officers violated department policy during a traffic stop last month when Israelah, in town for a rally by former President Donald Trump showed a "white privilege card" instead of a driver's license and was not ticketed. (Bill Roth / Anchorage Daily News)
Alaska officers violated policy in ‘white privilege’ stop

It’s unclear what policy was violated or what disciplinary actions the two officers faced.

Most Read