Hold music changes leave artists waiting by the telephone

Hold music changes leave artists waiting by the telephone

Alaska Music on Hold selections change after 4-month hiatus

Some musicians were surprised to see their songs cut from the playlist when the Alaska Music on Hold project returned this month.

Alaska Music on Hold replaces the state’s more typical hold Muzack with music by Alaskan artists. It went live Nov. 25 last year, and was paused sometime in January because of complaints that some songs included in the mix were inappropriate for public use, according to a state Department of Administration response to a Juneau Empire inquiry.

The music’s return was announced via a May 17 press release, and when it came back a pair of songs — “Flicker of Light” by Whiskey Class and “Mother Carries” by Harm — were no longer on the list of hold music. One new selection, “Bravura Variations on Alaska’s Flag Song” by Paul Rosenthal, is now part of the lineup.

Friday, May 17, 2019 (Anchorage) – Today Department of Administration Commissioner Kelly Tshibaka announced the Alaska Music on Hold project is back online after concerns were raised about previous content. When concerns were validated, project partners made a coordinated effort to ensure they were addressed appropriately. The Arts Council and the Department of Administration then partnered closely to develop a new track of music from Alaskan artists.

“Art is a significant element of Alaska culture and the Alaskan quality of life. It contributes to the health of our communities and economy and brings our people together,” said Commissioner Kelly Tshibaka. “I greatly appreciate the role the arts play in the lives of Alaskans and am excited for this opportunity to draw attention to a few of Alaska’s exceptional artists. I appreciate their creativity and skill and am glad they are a part of this wonderful project.”

Alaska Music on Hold is the product of a collaborative effort to install hold music on State of Alaska telephones that promotes Alaska recording artists and celebrates their rich contribution to our state.

“We are proud to sponsor and highlight Alaskan artists included on the track: Paul Rosenthal, Feeding Frenzy, the native Jazz Quartet, and Portugal. The Man,” said Commissioner Tshibaka. “The Alaska State Council on the Arts, Juneau Arts and Humanities Council, GCI, and the office of Representative Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins have all contributed to the success of the program.”

More information about the Alaska Music on Hold project, and the artists now included on the State of Alaska telephone system can be found here. — State of Alaska Department of Administration press release

“Nobody emailed us, no one called us,” said Heather Warren, lyricist and percussionist for Harm. “No one has notified us with anything. We didn’t even know that it was an issue.”

Patrick Troll of Whiskey Class said he also was not notified of the change.

Both Warren and Troll said they were initially excited about the additional exposure being part of the initial five-song lineup that included Grammy Award-winning band Portugal. The Man.

[State phone lines will feature Portugal. The Man as hold music]

Ben Brown, Chairman for Alaska State Council on the Arts, confirmed that the songs by Whiskey Class and Harm were no longer part of the Alaska Music on Hold Project, with which the council assists. Brown said he was not privy to the specific complaints that led to the change.

“None of that came directly to the council or to me,” Brown said.

He said reaching out to the affected artists would have been a good idea and something he would still try to do.

The DOA also did not share any specific complaints that led to the changes, but legislative liaison Kelly Hanke provided the Empire a link to a Must Read Alaska blog post as an example of public concerns.

Hold music changes leave artists waiting by the telephone

The blog post noted the “drunken wandering sound” of “Flicker of Light” makes for odd state hold music, as did the tone and content of “Mother Carries” by Harm. “‘Mother Carries’ and its discordant, trauma-driven message might just drive a distressed caller over the edge,” read the post. It notes one of the song’s genre tags is “witch house,” which is a a niche genre of electronic music that can include occult themes.

“Perhaps the Department of Administration didn’t consider what impact the song may have on a traumatized Alaskan calling the State in distress, perhaps trying to track down a birth certificate or a death certificate, or perhaps frustrated by the Office of Children’s Services or a probation officer,” read the post. “For that matter, what will serious business callers from Outside think of Alaska if they are considering opening an enterprise here? Is this a state that is open for business or is it an unhealthy place to call home?”

I will read a book

I will drink my coffee

I will take a walk

I will force a meal down

into my empty gut

I will learn to sew a patch

over the holes of my skin

I will listen to my silence

I will drink more water

I will learn to bake bread

I will brush my teeth

so that I can taste clean

I will only speak with intention

I will sleep for only a dream

I will try to love a stranger

I will save a dog from its dying howl

I will lock the hurt into itself

I will listen to my silence

I will only speak with intention

I will box a trauma as a joke and wrap it like a gift

I will give to my mother’s mother’s father and I won’t forget the ribbon.

Or the bow. Oh. Oh. Oh. Oh. Oh.

— “Mother Carries”

Warren took exception to the criticism.

“That particular song, it’s just a list of self-care techniques,” she said. Warren added that the spoken-word ending of the song that includes the line, “I will box a trauma as a joke and wrap it like a gift,” was not included in the song snippet sent for the hold music project.

Troll also wasn’t thrilled about the development, but understood why the Whiskey Class song would be on the chopping block.

“I mean, not being too harsh. But it makes sense,” he said in a message. “Everything that is going on with Alaska politics is the opposite of groovy, so why would they want groovy songs to be a representation of Alaska?”

Both Brown and the DOA indicated that the plan is for the Alaska Music on Hold project to continue and to involve new artists.

[Teacher turned full-time, traveling musician comes back to Juneau]

Brown said he hopes in the future there will be a transparent song-selection process involving a review panel.

He said some of the confusion surrounding the recent changes stems from the lack of such a system, which could begin to be developed relatively soon.

“It will be later this year,” Brown said. “I think what we’ll do is staff will come up with a proposal. Then, we’ll float it for all the trustees.”


• Contact arts and culture reporter Ben Hohenstatt at (907)523-2243 or bhohenstatt@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @BenHohenstatt.


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