This file photo from July 4, 2016, shows the city’s Fourth of July fireworks display over Juneau. (Micheal Penn | Juneau Empire File)

This file photo from July 4, 2016, shows the city’s Fourth of July fireworks display over Juneau. (Micheal Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Fourth of July fireworks get go-ahead

Assembly votes to hold display despite COVID concerns

The City and Borough of Juneau Assembly Committee of the Whole voted Monday to go ahead with the city’s Fourth of July fireworks display downtown this year.

Assembly members voted 5-4 during a virtual meeting to have the display, with some members raising concerns about holding events which draw large crowds. Mayor Beth Weldon and Assembly members Wade Bryson, Michelle Bonnet Hale, Rob Edwardson and Maria Gladziszewski voted for the display. Assembly members Carole Triem, Alicia Hughes-Skandijs, Greg Smith and Loren Jones voted against it.

Next week, the Assembly will consider a mandate requiring cloth face coverings while in public as cases of COVID-19 have been on the rise in Southeast Alaska.

Hale said she supported the display but would not be personally attending because of health concerns. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advise that prolonged contact and the number of people encountered increase the risk of public gathering .

“I think a lot of people could really use some relief right now,” Hale said.

Parades for downtown Juneau and Douglas have already been canceled. The fireworks display is still scheduled for 11:59 p.m. July 3.

There will also be an option for people who want to purchase fireworks.

Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska President Richard Chalyee Éesh Peterson posted on Facebook Tuesday that Tlingit & Haida would be selling fireworks at its property up Fish Creek Road on the way to Eaglecrest Ski Area.

“It was just something I thought we should do,” Peterson said in an interview.

Even though people can buy fireworks, Peterson said he hoped people would be safe and respectful when using them.

“Be respectful and mindful of your neighbors,” Peterson said. “We don’t want to see a bunch of trash lying around the next day.”

More in News

Personnel from the Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska load a front-end loader aboard the vessel Frontrunner for transit to Haines to provide relief and assistance in recovery efforts in Haines following catastrophic rainfall-fueled landslides, Dec. 3, 2020. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
State, local organizations respond to Haines disaster

Everyone from SAR specialists to tribal organizations to uniformed services are helping out.

Has it always been a police car? (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire)
Police calls for Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Thursday, Dec. 3

The most recent state and local numbers.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Wednesday, Dec. 2

The most recent state and local numbers.

Rep. Lance Pruitt, R-Anchorage, speaks during the House Finance Committee meeting as they work on SB 128, the Permanent Fund spending bill, in the Bill Ray Center in 2016. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Razor-thin state House race gets a recount

Recount starts Friday morning.

Gordon Chew uses a GoPro on a pole to assess the humpback entanglement while Steve Lewis carefully negotiates the full circumference of the whale. (Courtesy photo / Rachel Myron)
‘Small town’ residents rescue big animal

Nearly 20 people braved choppy seas and foul weather to free the snared whale

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Tuesday, Dec. 1

The most recent state and local numbers.

Most Read