Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks with his cabinet members at the Capitol on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Gov. Mike Dunleavy speaks with his cabinet members at the Capitol on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Dunleavy announces board, commission appointments

Edie Grunwald, mother of slain teen, named as parole board chair

As the first week of Legislative session drew to a close, Gov. Mike Dunleavy announced numerous appointments to the state’s boards and commissions.

Edie Grunwald of Palmer was designated as the chair of the State Board of Parole, and will serve in that role from March 1, 2019 to March 2, 2024. Grunwald ran in the Republican primary for lieutenant governor last year, but lost to Kevin Meyer. Grunwald is the mother of David Grunwald, a 16-year-old who was shot and killed in 2016. His death and the subsequent trials made statewide headlines.

Dunleavy appointed Ketchikan’s Sally Stockhausen and Anchorage’s Bob Griffin to the state Board of Education and Early Development. Tiffany Scott of Kotzebue was reappointed to the board.

To the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority Board of Trustees, the governor appointed Joe Riggs of Anchorage, Ken McCarty of Eagle River and John Sturgeon of Anchorage.

Anchorage’s Albert Fogle, Wasilla’s Bill Kending and Anchorage’s Julie Sande were named to the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and Alaska Energy Authority (AEA) boards. Their terms run until June 30, 2020.

Allen Hippler and Lorne Bretz of Anchorage were named to the Alaska Retirement Management Board, with terms that go from March 1 of this year to March 1, 2023. Darrol Hargraves of Wasilla and Tammy Randolph of North Pole were named to the University of Alaska Board of Regents, and will serve terms from Feb. 4, 2019 to Feb. 1, 2027.

Dunleavy reappointed Leif Holm of North Pole to the Board of Pharmacy. Holm will serve a term from March 1 to March 1, 2023. Wasilla’s Jessica Steele was appointed to the Board of Barbers and Hairdressers, and will serve from Nov. 11 to March 1, 2020.

Nome’s Charles Cross was appointed to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board for a term running from March 1 to March 1, 2022.

To the Alaska Labor Relations Agency, Dunleavy appointed Anchorage’s Paula Harrison and Fairbanks’ Bob Shefchik to terms that will run from March 1 to March 1, 2022. Karen Smith of Anchorage and Wes Tegeler of Wasilla were appointed to the Alaska State Board of Public Accountancy, and their terms will run from March 1 to March 1, 2023.

Dr. Dana Espindola of Eagle River was appointed to the Board of Certified Direct Entry Midwives, to a term running from March 1 to March 1, 2023. Fairbanksan John Anderson was appointed to the Board of Agriculture and Conservation. his term began on Dec. 18 and will run until Sept. 1, 2021. Ashlee Stetson was appointed to the Board of Certified Real Estate Appraisers. That term runs from Jan. 8 to March 1, 2023.


• Contact reporter Alex McCarthy at 523-2271 or amccarthy@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @akmccarthy.


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