Two men sentenced for illegal gun possession

This photo of Christopher Davison was released by the Juneau Police Department when the department issued a BOLO (be on the lookout) advisory April 21, 2017. (Photo courtesy of Juneau Police Department)

This photo of Christopher Davison was released by the Juneau Police Department when the department issued a BOLO (be on the lookout) advisory April 21, 2017. (Photo courtesy of Juneau Police Department)

Two Juneau men were sentenced this past Friday for separate federal firearms offenses.

Christopher W. Davison, 34, was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison followed by three years of supervised release for possession of firearms as a convicted felon, according to the release. Davison pleaded guilty to the charges in February, according to electronic court records.

According to the sentencing memorandum in the case, the Juneau Police Department got a report in April 2017 that a man was “tweaking hard” and threatening to “kill everybody.” The man told people at the scene to remember his name “Chris Davison,” according to the memorandum. A witness saw the man pull a sawed-off shotgun from under his arm or shirt.

The next day, according to the memo, officers spoke with a different witness who said he was awoken in the morning by Davison, who pointed a gun at his head. That day, officers saw Davison at a woman’s home, but Davison ran away from them. He was eventually tracked down and taken into custody that day, according to a report from the Empire at the time.

At the home, according to the memo, police found a 10/22 Ruger, which is classified as a pistol but can easily be confused for a larger gun.

“It is a menacing firearm on its own and much more so, when handled by some(one) under the influence of drugs,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Jack Schmidt wrote in the sentencing memorandum.

Davison was previously convicted for third-degree criminal mischief in 2010 and first-degree vehicle theft in 2012. Davison was also convicted this May on a riot charge that stemmed from a riot at Lemon Creek Correctional Center on Oct. 5, 2015. Schmidt had requested eight years in his sentencing memorandum.

In a separate hearing, 30-year-old James V. Drury was sentenced to six years in prison with three years of supervised release, according to a news release from the Alaska Department of Justice. Drury pleaded guilty this past September to firearm theft and possessing a firearm as a convicted felon.

According to the prosecution’s sentencing memorandum, Drury burglarized a Ketchikan home in May 2016 and stole two rifles. When the homeowner entered the room, according to the report, Drury pointed one of the guns at the homeowner and told him to freeze.

Drury fled from the scene, according to the report, and tried to hide the guns behind another home. According to the report, Drury had been convicted for first-degree attempted burglary in 2006 and first-degree burglary in 2009. Schmidt, who prosecuted the case, wrote the sentencing memorandum and requested a sentence of 10 years.

Schmidt prosecuted both cases, according to the release, and JPD, Alaska State Troopers and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) conducted the investigations in the cases.


• Contact reporter Alex McCarthy at 523-2271 or amccarthy@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @akmccarthy.


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