State reports 12 new cases statewide, 1 new locally

State reports 12 new cases statewide, 1 new locally

There’s a wait time for test results.

The state reported Thursday 12 new COVID-19 cases involving Alaska residents and one new case in the capital city.

This is the second day in a row a new COVID-19 case has been reported for City and Borough of Juneau, according to Alaska Department of Health and Social Services. The new case brings Juneau’s total since March to 39 cases. Of those, 35 people have recovered, according to DHSS. How the person contracted the illness is under investigation.

DHSS also reports one hospitalization for Juneau as of June 16. There have been six cumulative hospitalizations for Juneau. There have been 56 hospitalizations statewide.

According to City and Borough of Juneau’s COVID-19 Dashboard, none of the 15 ventilators in the city are in use.

Common symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough, breathing trouble, sore throat, muscle pain, and loss of taste or smell. Most people develop only mild symptoms. But some people, usually those with other medical complications, develop more severe symptoms, including pneumonia, which can be fatal.

Other areas with newly reported cases include Matanuska-Susitna Borough Borough with three, four for Fairbanks North Star Borough, two for Anchorage and one for Ketchikan Gateway Borough, in addition to the new Juneau case.

Testing remains in high-demand according to City and Borough of Juneau and across the state.

In a Thursday news release, the city said people who’ve recently been tested for COVID-19 at the Juneau at the city’s drive-thru testing facility or Juneau International Airport may be experiencing delays in getting results back because of high demand.

[Juneau a testing hub? Assembly considers buying machine]

The turnaround time for test results in Alaska and at some commercial labs is taking longer than usual, according to CBJ. Some test results are taking up to five days or longer to return with results. The state said it is addressing this issue and working toward faster turnaround times.

The city also continues to explore options to process tests on a large scale locally, instead of sending them to a state lab or out of state, according to CBJ. Having the ability to analyze test samples in Juneau would greatly reduce turnaround time. Results could be obtained within the same day instead of multiple days, helping to contribute to the public health and economy of the community.

With local capabilities, Juneau could also process COVID-19 test samples from other communities in Southeast.

CBJ Assembly wrote a letter to Governor Mike Dunleavy in May asking his administration to partner with CBJ toward this goal.

More in News

Personnel from the Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska load a front-end loader aboard the vessel Frontrunner for transit to Haines to provide relief and assistance in recovery efforts in Haines following catastrophic rainfall-fueled landslides, Dec. 3, 2020. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
State, local organizations respond to Haines disaster

Everyone from SAR specialists to tribal organizations to uniformed services are helping out.

Has it always been a police car? (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire)
Police calls for Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Thursday, Dec. 3

The most recent state and local numbers.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Wednesday, Dec. 2

The most recent state and local numbers.

Rep. Lance Pruitt, R-Anchorage, speaks during the House Finance Committee meeting as they work on SB 128, the Permanent Fund spending bill, in the Bill Ray Center in 2016. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Razor-thin state House race gets a recount

Recount starts Friday morning.

Gordon Chew uses a GoPro on a pole to assess the humpback entanglement while Steve Lewis carefully negotiates the full circumference of the whale. (Courtesy photo / Rachel Myron)
‘Small town’ residents rescue big animal

Nearly 20 people braved choppy seas and foul weather to free the snared whale

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Tuesday, Dec. 1

The most recent state and local numbers.

Most Read