Juneau residents line up outside of the Planet Alaska Gallery to sign an application petition to recall Gov. Mike Dunleavy on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Juneau residents line up outside of the Planet Alaska Gallery to sign an application petition to recall Gov. Mike Dunleavy on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Recall Dunleavy campaign gears up for court

First oral arguments to be heard this month

After having its application for a recall petition denied, the Recall Dunleavy campaign is gearing up for court.

The campaign is slated to have oral arguments in Anchorage Superior Court on Jan. 10 before Judge Eric Aarseth.

Recall Dunleavy Campaign Manager Claire Pywell said the campaign’s general counsel and former Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth and Susan Orlansky from Anchorage law firm Reeves Amodio will argue in court why the petition should not have been denied.

Pywell called the 10th a “big day” and said the campaign was looking forward to it.

“Our allegations reinforce in so many ways he is the wrong man for the job,” she said in a phone interview Thursday. “Alaskans deserve a governor that will faithfully execute the laws under the constitution.”

Chief Assistant Attorney General Margaret Peton-Walsch will be making arguments on behalf of the State of Alaska, according to Cori Mills, senior assistant attorney general with the Department of Law. Mills said the DOL could not comment further on the case due to the ongoing litigation.

On Nov. 4, the Department of Law denied the campaign’s application for a recall petition of Gov. Mike Dunleavy, saying the application was “both factually and legally insufficient to meet the statutory grounds for recall.” Attorney General Kevin Clarkson said in a statement at that time that a recall cannot be based on “disagreements with the elected official’s policies.”

The recall application met all the technical requirements and received a total of 49,006 signatures, well over the 28,501 required by law. It alleged four legal reasons Dunleavy should be recalled: he showed neglect, incompetence and lack of fitness for office. Those allegations include violating the state constitution by using state funds for political advertisements and violating the separation-of-powers by using his veto power to attack the Legislature and Judiciary

On Nov. 27, the campaign filed a motion against the Division of Elections, which oversees the recall process, following the Division’s refusal to certify the application for recall.

“The allegations by the recall group are not legitimate reasons to overturn the outcome of the statewide election held barely a year ago,” Dunleavy said in a statement following the application’s denial in November. “My priorities continue to be making Alaska safer for all Alaskans, growing the economy and enacting a solution to the state’s budget deficit.”


• Contact reporter Peter Segall at 523-2228 or psegall@juneauempire.com.


More in News

In this July 13, 2007, file photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska, near the village of Iliamma. (AP Photo / Al Grillo)
Pebble developer files appeal with Army Corps

The Army Corps of Engineers rejected Pebble Limited Partnership’s application in November.

This August 2019 photos shows a redline at Treadwell Arena designed by Tsimshian artist Abel Ryan. The arena is adding new weekly events to its schedule, City and Borough of Juneau announced. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Treadwell Arena adds new weekly events

Hockey and open skate are on the schedule.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Friday, Jan. 22

The most recent state and local numbers.

A Coast Guard Station Juneau 45-foot Response Boat-Medium patrols Auke Bay during an exercise in 2018. A response boat similar to the one in the photo was struck by a laser near Ketchikan on Saturday, Jan. 17, prompting an investigation into the crime. (Lt. Brian Dykens / U.S. Coast Guard)
Coast Guard wants information after laser pointed at boat

“Laser strikes jeopardize the safety of our boat crews…”

Has it always been a police car? (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire)
Police calls for Sunday, Jan. 24, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Thursday, Jan. 21

The most recent state and local numbers.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy addresses the public during a virtual town hall on Sept. 15, 2020 in Alaska. ( Courtesy Photo / Austin McDaniel, Office of the Governor)
Dunleavy pitches dividend change amid legislative splits

No clear direction has emerged from lawmakers.

Joar Leifseth Ulsom, right, wearing a bib with ExxonMobil lettering on it, congratulates Peter Kaiser on his win in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska. The world’s most famous sled dog race has lost another major sponsor as the Iditarod prepares for a scaled-back version of this year’s race because of the pandemic, officials said Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021. ExxonMobil confirmed to The Associated Press that the oil giant will drop its sponsorship of the race. (Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News)
ExxonMobil becomes latest sponsor to sever Iditarod ties

The world’s most famous sled dog race has lost another major sponsor.

Has it always been a police car? (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire)
Police calls for Friday, Jan. 22, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Most Read