Ed Schoenfeld talks during the Capital City Killers tour that was offered through the Juneau-Douglas City Museum. The tour has now morphed in a series of murder-themed presentations that will be accompanied by desserts at the museum. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire File)

Ed Schoenfeld talks during the Capital City Killers tour that was offered through the Juneau-Douglas City Museum. The tour has now morphed in a series of murder-themed presentations that will be accompanied by desserts at the museum. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire File)

Museum combines sweet treats and grisly crimes, Sitka earns grant and library plans new event

Capital City Weekly news in brief.

Sitka Fine Arts Camp awarded international Sigrid Rausing Trust grant

Sitka Fine Arts Camp has been awarded an international grant from London-based Philanthropy Sigrid Rausing Trust.

The Sigrid Rausing Trust website lists the value of the grant as $119,295, and the start date of the grant as Dec. 1, 2019.

The purpose of Sigrid Rausing Trust is to promote the values and principles of human rights, equality and the rule of law and to preserve nature from further degradation. One of 10 funding programs, their arts program funds grantees who work at the intersection of arts and human rights, social justice and conservation.

“The Arts have the power to change lives, to give young people some of the most important tools they will need to have success in their lives: including self-esteem, self-identity, reflection, and empathy,” said Sitka Fine Arts Camp Executive Director Roger Schmidt in a release. “It is a human right to have equal access to meaningful and rich arts experiences. This award allows us to continue to open the door wider to any Alaskan child wishing to be part of the arts rich environment of the Sitka Fine Arts Camp.”

The city museum combines murder and dessert

The Juneau-Douglas City Museum will offer three different true crime presentations in 2020 titled, “Death by Chocolate: An In-Depth Look at an Historic Murder in Juneau, Accompanied by a Chocolate Dessert.”

They will be presented by Ed Schoenfeld and Betsy Longenbaugh, each presentation will feature a chocolate dessert and an hour-long program on a murder from early days in Juneau and Douglas. The first Death by Chocolate presentation is 4-6 p.m. Jan. 11 at the museum. Tickets for each presentation are $25 and must be purchased in advance through the museum.

Historic researchers and former reporters Schoenfeld and Longenbaugh, will first delve into the 1902 death of N.C. Jones at the hands of Joseph MacDonald, then superintendent of the Treadwell mines. Participants will be served Chocolate Gold Cake.

Schoenfeld and Longenbaugh, received a Juneau History Grant in 2018 to create a public presentation about little-known murders that occurred in Juneau from 1898-1960. This popular presentation led Schoenfeld and Longenbaugh to create the “True Crimes: Capital Killers” walking tour for the City Museum, and as volunteer tour guides, they led four sold-out tours during the summer of 2019.

The next two Death by Chocolate presentations are scheduled for 4-6 p.m. Feb. 22 and March 7 and will focus on different murders accompanied by a different desserts.

Memory Cafe comes to Valley library

An event for people living with dementia and their care partners is planned for 2-4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 9 at the Mendenhall Valley Library.

Museum combines sweet treats and grisly crimes, Sitka earns grant and library plans new event

The Memory Cafe will be a chance for people to socialize and connect, and it will feature refreshments, games and more. It will also feature pianist Ron Somerville, who will play songs from the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s.

For more information call 586-0438.

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