A new Systematic Racism Review Committee will soon be in place to guide Juneau’s municipal lawmakers as they consider future ordinances. City Assembly members established the committee late last year after racial justice protests took place in Juneau and around the country throughout the summer of 2020. Here, Lacey Davis attends a May 30, 2020, vigil honoring George Floyd, the man whose death while in police custody sparked protests worldwide. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

Juneau seats members of the Systematic Racism Review committee

First meeting on April 1, policy review begins in July.

Juneau’s Systematic Racism Review Committee will soon be in place to guide Juneau’s municipal lawmakers as they consider future ordinances.

The committee will review all proposed ordinances and resolutions and advise if the proposal includes a systematic racism policy implication using criteria they will establish. When the committee identifies issues, they will present options for curing potential problems by presenting the information to the assembly, the city said in a news release.

The committee’s kick-off meeting will take place at noon on Thursday, April 1. At the organizational meeting, the committee will begin looking at parliamentary procedural training for committee members, establish a meeting cycle, and elect chairs.

The committee is scheduled to start reviewing legislation on July 1.

City Assembly members interviewed the committee candidates last month and have named Dominic Branson, Carla Casulucan, Gail Dabaluz, Grace Lee, Kelli Patterson, David Russell-Jensen and Lillian Worl to the committee.

Assembly member Christine Woll will serve as the committee’s liaison to the city assembly. Mila Cosgrove, deputy city manager, will represent city hall staff.

According to an earlier news release soliciting applications, the assembly was looking for committee members who “provide the most balanced representation possible” and with “experience identifying unlawful discrimination, experience identifying social justice inequity, or intimate knowledge of local cultures and practices, including tribal culture and practices.”

Contact Dana Zigmund at dana.zigmund@juneauempire.com or (907)308-4891.

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