People get drinks and sun at the Flight Deck, Thursday, May 21. Restaurants are among the businesses able to open to 100% capacity as of Friday, May 22, although many business owners and managers said they intend to proceed slowly. (Michael S. Lockett | Juneau Empire)

People get drinks and sun at the Flight Deck, Thursday, May 21. Restaurants are among the businesses able to open to 100% capacity as of Friday, May 22, although many business owners and managers said they intend to proceed slowly. (Michael S. Lockett | Juneau Empire)

Juneau businesses leerily eye new phase of reopening

Some are opening the throttle, but many are holding at Phase 2 levels.

With the instituting of full opening of almost all industries with few exceptions, Alaska is back in businesswith a few guidelines.

But is Juneau?

“We just sort of got our toes wet with 25%,” said Evan Wood, co-owner of Devil’s Club Brewing Co. “Obviously we have to see how this goes. See what the city says.”

The sentiment is common across the city.

“As of right now I’m gonna hold my ground on where I’m at,” said Dave McGivney, owner of McGivney’s. “We’re still gonna take it easy and observe and watch and see what happens. I’m gonna wait probably another month. What I don’t want to see is us all opening up, and we get a spike once that happens. I just don’t want to take the chance.”

Many are also holding fire until the City and Borough of Juneau Assembly has a chance to meet and discuss what measures they think are appropriate for the safety of Juneau. The Assembly expects to meet Thursday to discuss the opening, Assemblymember Alicia Hughes-Skandijs said in a message.

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“We’re staying with our protocols until we get everything set back up,” said Nathan Upton, manager for the Hangar on the Wharf. “We’re also waiting for the city to discuss it.”

Gyms, bars, restaurants and grocery stores are all included in the easing of restrictions. But almost all are holding at their Phase 2 lines until owners and operators have a better grasp on how things will shake out.

“Actually, we just had a manager’s meeting yesterday. We’re more comfortable with sticking to our Phase 2 protocols for a while. We’re evaluating things on a weekly basis from group fitness to distancing to cleaning to masks,” said Joe Parrish, an owner and manager of Pavitt’s Fitness. “44 people is more than we usually ever have in here so that hasn’t really affected it at all. We’re open and we’re doing everything we can to keep people safe.”

Full head of steam

Some businesses are already opeedn and don’t anticipate any change in operating protocols.

“We’ve been open the whole time. I don’t think it’ll be affecting us too much. Hope people are being safe out there. I think this whole thing has changed the way people think about going out in public,” said J.P. Oudekerk, assistant store manager at Super Bear IGA. “We know people need food, and we’ll be here like always.”

Others are planning soft opens over the weekend in anticipation of good news.

“The Flight Deck is fully opening tomorrow,” said Jeff Arnold, marketing director for the restaurants on the Wharf. ”Over the next couple days we’re gonna get those tables in, make sure everything’s safe and spaced out.”

• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at 757.621.1197 or mlockett@juneauempire.com.

Devil’s Club Brewing Co. will not immediately be taking advantage of the ability to open to 100% capacity, said co-owner Evan Wood. A sign on the door warns that customers with COVID-19 symptoms cannot enter the building. (Michael S. Lockett | Juneau Empire)

Devil’s Club Brewing Co. will not immediately be taking advantage of the ability to open to 100% capacity, said co-owner Evan Wood. A sign on the door warns that customers with COVID-19 symptoms cannot enter the building. (Michael S. Lockett | Juneau Empire)

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