First lady of Alaska Rose Dunleavy takes the microphone before welcoming the guests at the Reclaim Own And Renew Women’s Conference Friday night at Centennial Hall. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)

First lady of Alaska Rose Dunleavy takes the microphone before welcoming the guests at the Reclaim Own And Renew Women’s Conference Friday night at Centennial Hall. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)

First lady makes speaking debut at women’s conference

Rose Dunleavy likens women’s conference to public safety

Alaska’s new first lady, Rose Dunleavy, gave her first speech in Juneau at the Reclaim Own And Renew (ROAR) Women’s Conference on Friday night at Centennial Hall. Dunleavy welcomed the women to the conference, in which Elizabeth Smart was the conference’s keynote speaker. She spoke about overcoming trauma to live her best life.

Dunleavy is originally from Noorvik and has worked in the airline industry. She has been married 30 years and has three children. Before Gov. Mike Dunleavy won the election, they lived in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley.

Dunleavy’s hope for the women at the conference? She wanted them to feel empowered and know they can overcome life’s obstacles.

“You’re not alone — ever. There’s a lot of women to help,” Dunleavy said before the conference began, as she gestured to the women gathered for the conference. “There’s a lot of resources, too.”

She also thanked the leaders at Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, the group that launched ROAR, for giving her an “awesome” opportunity.

Dunleavy smiled as she took the microphone before making her short speech. She thanked the audience.

“I’m still settling into Juneau, and I’m grateful for the hospitality you’ve shown my family,” Dunleavy said.

Dunleavy said the message of ROAR is powerful.

“The meaning speaks to me,” Dunleavy said in front of the sold-out auditorium. “That attitude is why I’m here today.”

[Residents express frustrations, stories of Juneau crime wave]

She likened the concept of ROAR to Alaska’s crime issues.

Dunleavy said her husband ran on a platform of “reclaiming public safety in Alaska” and that too many Alaskans live their lives in fear of abuse and neglect. She encouraged and supported legislators in making public safety a priority.

“I support reclaiming public safety in our great state,” Dunleavy said as she wrapped up her short, welcome speech. “We can reclaim the Alaska we all know and love.”


• Contact reporter Kevin Baird at 523-2258.


First lady Rose Dunleavy explains how women can rely on each other during a brief interview before the Reclaim Own And Renew Women’s Conference. (Ben Hohentstatt | Juneau Empire)

First lady Rose Dunleavy explains how women can rely on each other during a brief interview before the Reclaim Own And Renew Women’s Conference. (Ben Hohentstatt | Juneau Empire)

First lady of Alaska Rose Dunleavy speaks at the Reclaim Own And Renew Women’s Conference Friday night at Centennial Hall. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)

First lady of Alaska Rose Dunleavy speaks at the Reclaim Own And Renew Women’s Conference Friday night at Centennial Hall. (Ben Hohenstatt | Juneau Empire)

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