Capitol Live: Crime bill gets rolling as special session begins

Capitol Live: Crime bill gets rolling as special session begins

Live updates from inside the Capitol.

5:55 p.m.

There’s a pretty good breakdown here from Sen. Scott Kawasaki about what was passed on the regular session’s final day and what still needs to be done:

And here’s our coverage from today:

‘Beyond Senate Bill 91’: Crime bill would put more people in prison longer

Million dollar special session? Here’s how much it will cost the state

3:03 p.m.

We heard from Speaker of the House Bryce Edgmon earlier, who said he foresees the House taking faster action on the crime bill. He says the House could vote on it as soon as 3 p.m. Monday, because they want to make it clear that they’re committed to taking initiative on cutting down on crime.

1:20 p.m.

Senate President Cathy Giessel says to expect the crime bill to pass the Legislature in a couple weeks. She says Legislative Legal Services will go over the bill this weekend to see if there are any drafting errors, and the bill should be on lawmakers’ desks around next Tuesday. She says they hope to give lawmakers a week to look at it closely, and then they’ll likely vote on it either the Tuesday or Wednesday after Memorial Day.

12:25 p.m.

Note: An earlier version of this update had a typo, putting “hours” instead of “powers.” That’s been changed.

The conference members signed a request “limited powers of free conference,” in other words asking permission to make changes. Both houses of the Legislature will now be able to vote on that, I believe.

Here’s a photo of the two co-chairs:

Rep. Matt Claman, D-Anchorage, and Sen. Shelley Hughes, R-Palmer, serve as the co-chairs of the Conference Committee on House Bill 49 on Thursday, May 16, 2019. (Alex McCarthy | Juneau Empire)

Rep. Matt Claman, D-Anchorage, and Sen. Shelley Hughes, R-Palmer, serve as the co-chairs of the Conference Committee on House Bill 49 on Thursday, May 16, 2019. (Alex McCarthy | Juneau Empire)

12:15 p.m.

As expected, there are quite a few compromises here.

The main focus of discussion today has been the Pretrial Enforcement Division. The risk assessment tool — which judges consult to decide whether a person can be released under Pretrial supervision — apparently will no longer hold the weight it currently does. We’ll get more details on this soon, I imagine. Lots of information dropped all at once here.

Hughes thanks members of the public for being vocal on crime issues.

“They’ve put pressure on folks in this building,” Hughes says.

12:05 p.m.

The conference committee on HB 49 is under way, and they’re hitting the ground running.

Rep. Matt Claman, co-chair of the committee, is reading off a list of compromises that have been made to the bill. You can read those here.

11:50 a.m.

Believe it or not, the conference committee meeting has been delayed. We’re still very much in wait-and-see mode. Pretty quiet building today, which is apparently fairly normal for the beginning of a special session.

10:20 a.m.

Both the Senate and House floor sessions lasted just a matter of minutes. The conference committee on House Bill 49 is still scheduled to meet at 11 a.m., and both the House and Senate plan to reconvene after that.

That hearing, if it’s anything like the budget conference committee’s first meeting, could be very short and uneventful. The members of that committee appear to have been meeting behind closed doors in recent days, though, so maybe they’ve got something up their sleeves.

10 a.m.

The special session is under way. Both houses of the Legislature are doing brief floor sessions before the conference committee on crime meets at 11 a.m.

The Senate has gaveled in. Sen. Click Bishop, R-Fairbanks, gives the invocation including a couple Bible verses, including Isaiah 43:18-19, which says:

Remember not the former things, nor consider the things of old. Behold, I am doing a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?

Also, some more thoughts from legislators on Twitter as we get going:

More in News

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a glance for Tuesday, Oct. 19

The most recent state and local figures

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This 2011 photo shows the Taku and Malaspina ferries at the Auke Bay Terminal. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Costs add up as ferry idled nearly 2 years

The cost to the state for docking an Alaska ferry that has… Continue reading

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

teaser
Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos of Southeast Alaska.

Tone and Charles Deehr in Fairbanks, October 2021. Both photos courtesy Charles Deehr. 3. (Courtesy Photo / Charles Deehr)
Alaska Science Forum: Red aurora rare enough to be special

In decades of sky-watching in the north, he has seen a few red auroras, but not many.

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Saturday, Oct. 17, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a glance for Thursday, Oct. 14

The most recent state and local figures

Most Read