A rainy Monday morning marked the first day of fall semester at the University of Alaska Southeast which comes just days before the university announced its search for a new chancellor to begin June 2023. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

UAS announces search for new chancellor

Current chancellor is set to retire in late June after serving three years in the position.

Just days after the start of a new academic year, the University of Alaska Southeast has announced another new beginning as it undertakes its search for a new campus chancellor.

[Fall semester starts at the University of Alaska Southeast]

The Juneau-based university’s current chancellor, Karen Carey, announced in May she will be retiring from her position at UAS and is set to bid farewell to her position at the end of the academic year in June 2023 — which means the search has begun to fill her shoes after what she said was an unexpected time filling the role.

Originally starting as provost for the university, Carey said she was a part of the 2020 process of finding a new chancellor for UAS after the previous chancellor, Rick Caulfield, retired but did not have intentions to fill the position.

She said she planned to be a helping hand to the chosen candidate before she planned to retire, but that changed when former UA President Jim Johnsen announced his plan to consolidate UAS with University of Alaska Fairbanks which led to the chancellor search being called off.

But, soon after Johnsen announced his retirement, his replacement, current UA President Pat Pitney, called off his consolidation plan, which in turn meant the UAS would need a chancellor after all.

“It was very very weird — it was complicated,” Carey said in an interview. “Shortly after Pat became president, she asked me if I’d serve as chancellor,” she said. “So I was interim chancellor, then appointed permanent chancellor in November ‘20.”

Carey, who is 70, said she’s retiring now because of age and said “getting a fresh person in there is just the right thing to do at this time.” She’s going to miss “everything” about being chancellor at UAS and is excited to use her free time traveling once her retirement begins next summer. But, she won’t be too far away as she said she intends to stay in Juneau after falling in love with the city during her time working at UAS.

She is set to finish off this academic year before her spot is expected to be filled no later than July 1, 2023, according to a UAS news release. The application period to fill her position is currently open and will remain so until the end of October.

“We’re really excited about it,” said Jennifer Ward Brown, the search committee co-chair and the UAS faculty senate president. “We’re really excited about new possibilities.”

Ward Brown said Pitney appointed nine UAS leaders this early summer to work together throughout this academic year to compile a list of finalists.

She said from there, the committee will go through multiple processes including chances for faculty, staff, students, alumni and community stakeholders to voice opinions before a candidate is chosen for the position.

“When we are at the point where we have our finalists, we will definitely have a series of chances for different people to meet with the finalists, ask them questions, and then give feedback to the search committee,” she said.

Ward Brown said it’s “sad” to say goodbye to Carey but said she is excited for the new possibilities that come with bringing on a new leader.

“She served UAS very well throughout the time that she has been here and been a really fierce advocate for us — we’re sad to see her go,” she said.

Ward Brown said the search committee is looking for someone who is a “collaborative leader” and will listen and advocate for the staff and students at the university. She said she hopes having a new chancellor will have a positive impact on the students and will “continue the great work chancellor Karen has done.”

• Contact reporter Clarise Larson at clarise.larson@juneauempire.com or (651)-528-1807. Follow her on Twitter at @clariselarson.

University of Alaska Southeast Chancellor Karen Carey is set to retire from her position in June 2023. (Courtesy / University of Alaska Southeast)

University of Alaska Southeast Chancellor Karen Carey is set to retire from her position in June 2023. (Courtesy / University of Alaska Southeast)

More in News

(Juneau Empire file photo)
Aurora forecast for the week of April 15

These forecasts are courtesy of the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Tuesday, April 16, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

An illustration depicts a planned 12-acre education campus located on 42 acres in Juneau owned by the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, which was announced during the opening of its annual tribal assembly Wednesday. (Image courtesy of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska)(Image courtesy of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska)
Tribal education campus, cultural immersion park unveiled as 89th annual Tlingit and Haida Assembly opens

State of the Tribe address emphasizes expanding geographical, cultural and economic “footprint.”

In an undated image provided by Ken Hill/National Park Service, Alaska, the headwaters of the Ambler River in the Noatak National Preserve of Alaska, near where a proposed access road would end. The Biden administration is expected to deny permission for a mining company to build a 211-mile industrial road through fragile Alaskan wilderness, handing a victory to environmentalists in an election year when the president wants to underscore his credentials as a climate leader and conservationist. (Ken Hill/National Park Service, Alaska via The New York Times)
Biden’s Interior Department said to reject industrial road through Alaskan wilderness

The Biden administration is expected to deny permission for a mining company… Continue reading

An aerial view of downtown Juneau. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire file photo)
Task force to study additional short-term rental regulations favored by Juneau Assembly members

Operator registration requirement that took effect last year has 79% compliance rate, report states.

Cheer teams for Thunder Mountain High School and Juneau-Douglas High School: Yadaa.at Kalé perform a joint routine between quarters of a Feb. 24 game between the girls’ basketball teams of both schools. It was possibly the final such local matchup, with all high school students scheduled to be consolidated into JDHS starting during the next school year. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
State OKs school district’s consolidation plan; closed schools cannot reopen for at least seven years

Plans from color-coded moving boxes to adjusting bus routes well underway, district officials say.

Snow falls on the Alaska Capitol and the statue of William Henry Seward on Monday, April 1. (James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
Alaska’s carbon storage bill, once a revenue measure, is now seen as boon for oil and coal

Last year, when Gov. Mike Dunleavy proposed legislation last year to allow… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Monday, April 15, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Juneau’s Recycling Center and Household Hazardous Waste Facility at 5600 Tonsgard Court. (City and Borough of Juneau photo)
Recycleworks stops accepting dropoffs temporarily due to equipment failure

Manager of city facility hopes operations can resume by early next week

Most Read