Lisa Ibias, left, and her daughter, Alex Brown, work on clothing racks Monday for their new Alaskan Dames Consignment Shop branch opening later this month on Seward Street.

Lisa Ibias, left, and her daughter, Alex Brown, work on clothing racks Monday for their new Alaskan Dames Consignment Shop branch opening later this month on Seward Street.

Seward Street shuffle

Pedestrians and passersby may have noticed some changes on Seward Street in downtown Juneau. Here’s a run-down of what’s changed and what’s to come.

Alaskan Dames Consignment Shop, a clothing and furniture store, is opening a new location on Seward Street as soon as this week.

“Before Friday is the goal,” said Madison Massey, manager at Alaskan Dames. “It happened faster than even we anticipated. We knocked out the walls, there’s painting being done.”

Alaskan Dames, owned by Lisa Ibias, has been located in the Airport Shopping Center on Glacier Highway for about 17 years. Massey said the store recently downsized. The furniture and household items have been integrated into the clothing side of the business.

In 2014, Alaskan Dames opened Lilette, an upscale consignment shop, on Dunn Street in the Mendenhall Valley.

“The downtown location will be a blend between Alaskan Dames and Lilette. There’ll be higher end items, new and used. There’ll be men’s wear as well, along with local art and boutique pieces of furniture,” Massey said.

The downtown shop — as yet to be named — will be open Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

It’s located on 217 Seward Street, where Urban Eskimo was housed for 11 years. Owner John Delgado moved his shop across the street earlier this month to 220 Seward Street.

“It’s about a third bigger, and it connects to a workshop/framing studio that we always had but were disconnected from, so it just works out better,” Delgado said.

“Now, we’re going to take on framing a little more than we used to. We fix and restore old frames as well,” he added.

The shop features Pendleton Woolen Mills men’s products, accessories and blankets, along with Alaska Native art, vintage ivory, vintage baskets and Alaskana items.

With a customer base that’s half local, half tourist, Delgado said Seward Street offers a “nice historic feel” without the “mob scene” that occurs down the hill on South Franklin Street during cruise ship season.

Next door, between Urban Eskimo and Salt, will be Salt’s new private dining room, which will be able to seat up to 12 people.

“It’s going to be a self-sufficient room with its own music, its own server, and we’ll be offering personalized tasting menus with wine pairings,” said Kris Schwartz, general manager and part owner of Salt.

The other owners are Rob Hynes, Tracy LaBarge and Salt chef Lionel Uddipa.

Schwartz said the private dining room likely won’t be ready until the fall. He’s also part owner of McGivney’s Downtown Sports Bar & Grill, which just had its grand opening earlier this month.

Schwartz said Salt, which features Alaskan cuisine, often gets requests for a private dining space where people can’t be interrupted.

Schwartz said Uddipa will be able to provide chef tableside service.

“He likes to come out to tables and be interactive with guests, whether it’s pouring a sauce over a fish or whipping something up tableside,” Schwartz said.

Uddipa has been at Salt for two years. The restaurant did a tasting menu for Valentine’s Day, which featured Japanese Kunamoto oysters, Alaskan weathervane scallops, roasted sunchoke soup, Maple Valley Farms duck breast, braised oxtail and chocolate mousse.

Across the street on 209 Seward Street will be a new business, Zootz Alor.

“It’s going to sell tobacco, tobacco accessories, glassware, novelties, gifts. We have a line of e-liquids and vaporizers. We also will be doing graphics and decals. We’ll have some tourist items,” said co-owner Lynne Lee.

Lee said Zootz Alor will have a soft opening April 1 with a grand opening later in the month. The shop will open in the afternoon and evenings, seven days a week in the summer and between five and seven days in the winter depending on customer demand.

Another change in the area includes a new clothing store at 230 Seward Street called Pretty Please Juneau. (For more information on that store, see this story in the March 23 issue of Capital City Weekly, the Empire’s sister publication.) It’s in the same building where Panhandle Provisions used to be located. That space and another building storefront is available for lease or sale.

• Contact reporter Lisa Phu at 523-2246 or lisa.phu@juneauempire.com.

Seward Street in Downtown Juneau.

Seward Street in Downtown Juneau.

John Delgado goes through his Pendleton wool shirts Monday in his Urban Eskimo shop at its new location across Seward Street from his former location. Delgado has run his shop for 11 years.

John Delgado goes through his Pendleton wool shirts Monday in his Urban Eskimo shop at its new location across Seward Street from his former location. Delgado has run his shop for 11 years.

More in News

(Juneau Empire file photo)
Aurora forecast for the week of Feb. 26

These forecasts are courtesy of the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Monday, Feb. 26, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Former state labor commissioner Ed Flanagan, State Rep. Genevieve Mina, D-Anchorage, and the Rev. Michael Burke of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Anchorage wheel boxes of signed petitions into a state Division of Elections office on Jan. 9. The petitions were for a ballot initiative to increase the state’s minimum wage, mandate paid sick leave and ensure that workers are not required to hear employers’ political or religious messages. (Photo by Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)
Minimum wage increase, ranked choice repeal have enough signatures to be on ballot

A pair of ballot measures have enough public support to appear on… Continue reading

State senators meet with members of the media at the Alaska State Capitol to discuss education legislation after a press conference by Gov. Mike Dunleavy on the topic on Tuesday. (Mark Sabbatini/Juneau Empire)
Dunleavy threatens veto of education bill if more of his priorities aren’t added

It is not certain there would be the 40 votes necessary to override a veto by the governor

Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire
Nanibaa’ Frommherz, a student at Thunder Mountain High School, testifies about a proposal to help the Juneau School District with its financial crisis during a Juneau Assembly Committee of the Whole meeting Monday night at City Hall. The meeting was moved from the Assembly Chambers to a conference room toward the end due to technical errors that disrupted the live online feed.
Little public reaction to city’s bailout of school district this year, but big questions beyond loom

Only two people testify Monday about proposed $4.1M loan and taking over $3.9 in “shared costs.”

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Sunday, Feb. 25, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Mauka Grunenberg looks at live oysters for sale on Aug. 29, 2022, at Sagaya City Market in Anchorage. The oysters came from a farm in Juneau. Oysters, blue mussels and sugar, bull and ribbon kelp are the main products of an Alaska mariculture industry that has expanded greatly in recent years. (Photo by Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)
Alaska’s mariculture industry expands, with big production increases in recent years, report says

While Alaska’s mariculture industry is small by global standards, production of farmed… Continue reading

U.S. Rep. Mary Peltola (center) walks with Alaska Rep. Will Stapp, R-Fairbanks, and Alaska Sen. Lyman Hoffman, D-Bethel, into the Alaska House of Representatives chambers ahead of her annual address to the Alaska Legislature on Monday. (Mark Sabbatini/Juneau Empire)
Peltola celebrates federal intervention in Albertsons, Kroger merger in legislative address

Congresswoman says wins for Alaska’s fisheries and state’s economy occurring through collaboration.

Sen. Shelley Hughes, R-Palmer, speaks in support of Senate concurrence on a version of an education bill passed by the Alaska House last week during a Senate floor discussion on Monday. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Senate concurs on House education bill, Dunleavy is skeptical

Dunleavy schedules press conference Tuesday afternoon in Anchorage to discuss the legislation.

Most Read