SeaWorld: Tilikum, orca that killed trainer, has died

In this March 7, 2011 photo orca whale Tilikum, right, watches as SeaWorld Orlando trainers take a break during a training session at the theme park's Shamu Stadium in Orlando, Fla. Tilikum, an orca that killed a trainer at SeaWorld Orlando in 2010, has died. According to SeaWorld, the whale died Friday, Dec. 30. 2016.

In this March 7, 2011 photo orca whale Tilikum, right, watches as SeaWorld Orlando trainers take a break during a training session at the theme park's Shamu Stadium in Orlando, Fla. Tilikum, an orca that killed a trainer at SeaWorld Orlando in 2010, has died. According to SeaWorld, the whale died Friday, Dec. 30. 2016.

ORLANDO, Fla. — Tilikum, an orca that killed a trainer at SeaWorld Orlando in 2010 and was profiled in a documentary that helped sway popular opinion against keeping killer whales in captivity at SeaWorld parks, has died.

Sea World officials said Friday that Tilikum died but did not give a cause of death. In a statement, the officials said Tilikum had faced serious health issues including a persistent and complicated bacterial lung infection. He was estimated to be 36 years old. A necropsy will be performed, according to the statement.

The 2010 death of SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau during a performance with Tilikum after a “Dine with Shamu” show shocked the public and changed the future of orcas at SeaWorld parks.

Brancheau was interacting with Tilikum before a live audience at SeaWorld Orlando when he pulled her from a platform by her arm and held her underwater. An autopsy report said Brancheau drowned but also suffered severe trauma, including multiple fractures.

SeaWorld Entertainment officials announced in March 2016 that the tourist attraction would end its orca breeding program and theatrical shows involving killer whales.

While the breeding program continued, Tilikum was SeaWorld’s most prolific male orca, siring 14 calves during his time at SeaWorld Orlando. He arrived at the park about 25 years ago.

He was noticeable for his size at more than 22 feet and 11,800 pounds.

“Tilikum had, and will continue to have, a special place in the hearts of the SeaWorld family, as well as the millions of people all over the world that he inspired,” SeaWorld President and CEO Joel Manby said. “My heart goes out to our team who cared for him like family.”

Tilikum was born off the waters of Iceland and moved to Sealand of the Pacific in Canada after being captured. While at Sealand in 1992, Tilikum and two female orcas were responsible for the death of a part-time trainer who slipped and fell into their pool and was submerged by them.

Tilikum was moved to SeaWorld Orlando a short time later, and Sealand later closed.

The decision to end the SeaWorld breeding program and theatrical shows came six years after Brancheau’s death and three years after the release of the documentary, “Blackfish,” which chronicled Tilikum’s life and Brancheau’s death.

Her death was not the only one linked to Tillikum at SeaWorld. In 1999, a naked man who had eluded security and sneaked into SeaWorld at night was found dead the next morning draped over Tilikum in a breeding tank in the back of Shamu Stadium.

The “Blackfish” documentary argued that killer whales, when in captivity, become more aggressive toward humans and each other. After the documentary played at the Sundance Film Festival and aired on CNN, several entertainers pulled out of planned performances at SeaWorld parks and animal rights activists increased their demonstrations outside the parks.

Attendance at SeaWorld parks dipped, the company faced falling profits and Southwest Airlines ended its 25-year relationship with the theme park company.

In March, SeaWorld CEO acknowledged that the public’s attitude had changed about keeping killer whales captive and that the company would end its orca breeding program.

“We needed to move where society was moving,” Manby said.

More in News

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a Glance for Friday, Dec.3

Numbers come from reports from the City and Borough of Juneau Emergency… Continue reading

Police are investigating a number of crimes across Juneau that occurred in November. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police investigating a number of November crimes

The crimes aren’t apparently connected, but they are all vehicle-related.

Beth McEwen, municipal clerk for the City and Borough of Juneau in her office on July 19. Members of the Alaska Association of Municipal Clerks elected McEwen to serve as the education director for the organization. (Dana Zigmund / Juneau Empire File)
CBJ clerk to lead education efforts for clerks across Alaska

“We are thrilled to bring her on to the executive board.”

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a Glance for Thursday, Dec. 2

Numbers come from reports from the City and Borough of Juneau Emergency… Continue reading

A man missing for more than 40 years was identified by the Alaska Bureau of Investigation as a Chugiak resident who was last seen in 1979 before being discovered murdered years before on an island near Anchorage in 1989. (Courtesy photo / Alaska Department of Public Safety)
Body found in ’80s ID’d with DNA analysis

The body, found in 1989, had been unidentified until now.

teaser
Planet Alaska: Visiting the ancestors through glimpses of glyphs

We live in Tlingit Aaní on Kaachxaan.akw’w where our petroglyphs are a symbol of home.

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a Glance for Wednesday, Dec. 1

Numbers come from reports from the City and Borough of Juneau Emergency… Continue reading

Most Read