Richard Asplund, left, and Nate Narum, from the Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, roll out chain-link fencing before installation along the pedestrian walkway over the Douglas Bridge on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Richard Asplund, left, and Nate Narum, from the Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, roll out chain-link fencing before installation along the pedestrian walkway over the Douglas Bridge on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Pedestrian bridge crossing gets extra safety

Complaint led to installation of fencing

Clad in bright orange and yellow vests and hard hats, employees from the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities tried to make the Douglas Bridge a little safer Monday.

They strung chain-link fence along the railing next to the sidewalk on the bridge, spanning the entire length of the bridge. The fencing is going up as a safety precaution, DOT spokesperson Aurah Landau said via email Monday.

There wasn’t an incident that led to the project, she said, but it stemmed from a complaint in early September that the space between the vertical bars on the railing was wide enough for someone or something to fit through.

“There was a concern that the vertical bars in the bridge railing were a bit too wide,” Landau said via email. “The bridge was built to specifications for vertical bar spacing at the time of building, but those specifications have since changed. While DOT&PF is not required to upgrade outside of a renovation project, adding the fencing made sense in this case.”

Specifically, Landau said, the concern was that the spaces were wide enough for a small child to fit through.


• Contact reporter Alex McCarthy at 523-2271 or amccarthy@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @akmccarthy.


A crew from the Department of Transportation and Public Facilities installs chain-link fencing along the pedestrian walkway over the Douglas Bridge on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

A crew from the Department of Transportation and Public Facilities installs chain-link fencing along the pedestrian walkway over the Douglas Bridge on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Rolls of chain-link fencing sit ready to be installed by the Department of Transportation and Public Facilities along the pedestrian walkway over the Douglas Bridge on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Rolls of chain-link fencing sit ready to be installed by the Department of Transportation and Public Facilities along the pedestrian walkway over the Douglas Bridge on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

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