Harmony Wentz, Faith Rogers’ daughter, holds a framed picture showing a young Faith and her two sisters. According to Juneau Police Department spokesperson Lt. Krag Campbell, authorities are working to identify a suspect in Rogers’ death. (Clarise Larson/ Juneau Empire)

Harmony Wentz, Faith Rogers’ daughter, holds a framed picture showing a young Faith and her two sisters. According to Juneau Police Department spokesperson Lt. Krag Campbell, authorities are working to identify a suspect in Rogers’ death. (Clarise Larson/ Juneau Empire)

Homicide investigation continues a month after suspicious death

Police say autopsy results could take six to eight months to receive

Authorities and the family of a woman found dead on a popular Juneau trail are looking for answers a month after the suspicious death that prompted an ongoing homicide investigation.

As of Friday, one month had passed since the body of 55-year-old Juneau woman Faith Rogers was discovered near Kaxdigoowu Héen Dei, also known as Brotherhood Bridge Trail.

JPD spokesperson Lt. Krag Campbell said in a Friday afternoon email that JPD is working with the State Crime Lab and the Medical Examiner’s office to identify a suspect and continues to seek information from the public related to activity on the trail, specifically between the hours of noon and 4 p.m. the day of Rogers’ death or other information that may impact the investigation.

JPD can be reached at (907)586-0600. Anonymous tips can be made online at www.juneaucrimeline.com.

According to Campbell, JPD has yet to receive a report from an autopsy, which was scheduled for Friday, Sept. 23 at the Medical Examiner’s Office in Anchorage, and added that the Medical Examiner’s Office told police it could be anywhere from six to eight months to receive the report.

This time frame is longer than the one previously outlined by JPD spokesperson Erann Kalwara, who in a late September email told the Empire autopsy results often take six to eight weeks, but preliminary results could come sooner depending on how the examination goes.

Michelle Rogers, Faith Rogers’ younger sister, said she and her family are “holding in there” but said it remains difficult, and the loss hits her at different times.

“It’s still hard, we already lost my little sister, and now I have no sisters left — it’s like having some limbs amputated,” she said. “Hug the people you love and tell them that you love them whenever you get the chance.”

[‘It’s shocking’: Family hopes for answers after suspicious death of loved one]

Faith Rogers’ funeral was held on Oct. 8 and her cremains were buried at Saint Therese Columbarium last Thursday, said her father, James Rogers. He said the family is doing OK and did not have any updates to share with the public at this time.

“We’re holding up all right,” James said.

Campbell said JPD would like for the public to know that due to the ongoing nature of this criminal investigation, they are unable to discuss specific elements of the case. Earlier this week JPD denied a Juneau Empire records request to receive the recording of the 911 call on the afternoon of Sept. 21 that alerted police to a body on the trail, saying the request could reasonably be expected to interfere with enforcement proceedings.

“JPD encourages the public to always take personal safety precautions such as being aware of surroundings (not distracted by gadgets), travelling on well-known, well lit routes, traveling in pairs or groups and immediately leaving uncomfortable or potentially unsafe situations are always a good idea,” Campbell said.

• Contact reporter Clarise Larson at clarise.larson@juneauempire.com or (651)-528-1807. Follow her on Twitter at @clariselarson.

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