Alaska Outdoors

A flying squirrel digs for a truffle in this undated photo. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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On the Trails: Dispersal of fungal spores

How fungus spreads among us.

A flying squirrel digs for a truffle in this undated photo. (Courtesy Photo / Bob Armstrong)
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Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos of Southeast Alaska.

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Fairbanks City Transit System No. 142 of “Into the Wild” fame inside the engineering building on the UAF campus, where UA Museum of the North conservators will work on its preservation. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Fairbanks City Transit System No. 142 of “Into the Wild” fame inside the engineering building on the UAF campus, where UA Museum of the North conservators will work on its preservation. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Cheryl Fellman enters the chilly waters of Auke Bay. Freeman is on the verge of becoming one of only 43 Americans — and 422 people worldwide — to swim an official Ice Mile. (Courtesy photo/Cheryl Fellman)
Cheryl Fellman enters the chilly waters of Auke Bay. Freeman is on the verge of becoming one of only 43 Americans — and 422 people worldwide — to swim an official Ice Mile. (Courtesy photo/Cheryl Fellman)
Snow and rain are often annoying, but without the right amounts, rivers become too low for good floats and salmon spawning. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: The two types of climate change

It’s about reusable water bottles, but also energy efficient homes.

Snow and rain are often annoying, but without the right amounts, rivers become too low for good floats and salmon spawning. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
This photo shows a brown-headed cowbird. Adult brown-headed cowbirds in North America practice brood parasitism in which they remove eggs from a host nest and replace them with eggs of their own. (Courtesy Photo / DonaldRMiller Photography, Wikimedia)

On the Trails: Infanticide and egg-destruction

Some regular infanticide and egg-destruction occurs between species.

This photo shows a brown-headed cowbird. Adult brown-headed cowbirds in North America practice brood parasitism in which they remove eggs from a host nest and replace them with eggs of their own. (Courtesy Photo / DonaldRMiller Photography, Wikimedia)
A praying mantis eats the remnants of its mate. In most cases, females that are cannibalistic gain reproductive advantages by laying larger, bigger eggs that survive better than those of non-cannibalistic females. Therefore their deceased mates also gain reproductive advantages.(Oliver Koemmerling / Wikimedia)

On the Trails: Having family for dinner

Cannibalism in nature can be a family affair.

A praying mantis eats the remnants of its mate. In most cases, females that are cannibalistic gain reproductive advantages by laying larger, bigger eggs that survive better than those of non-cannibalistic females. Therefore their deceased mates also gain reproductive advantages.(Oliver Koemmerling / Wikimedia)
Sunset at Beaver Lake. (Courtesy Photo / Michael Humling)

The Salmon State: Bear man of Admiralty Island Allen Hasselborg — and climate change

By Mary Catharine Martin The Salmon State Every day for decades, bear hunter, guide, and early 20th century Southeast Alaska homesteader Allen Hasselborg logged the… Continue reading

Sunset at Beaver Lake. (Courtesy Photo / Michael Humling)
Tone and Charles Deehr in Fairbanks, October 2021. Both photos courtesy Charles Deehr. 3. (Courtesy Photo / Charles Deehr)

Alaska Science Forum: Red aurora rare enough to be special

In decades of sky-watching in the north, he has seen a few red auroras, but not many.

Tone and Charles Deehr in Fairbanks, October 2021. Both photos courtesy Charles Deehr. 3. (Courtesy Photo / Charles Deehr)
The author photographs one of the numerous bull moose he and his wife saw on an elk hunt in Wyoming. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: Desired vs. realized success

No elk taken, but it’s nothing to grouse about.

The author photographs one of the numerous bull moose he and his wife saw on an elk hunt in Wyoming. (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
Salmonberry leaves of unusual color on one cane; nearby canes bore green leaves.(Courtesy Photo / Mary F. Willson)

On the Trails: Fall colors in our rainforest

Here are a few examples of enjoyable displays of fall colors…

Salmonberry leaves of unusual color on one cane; nearby canes bore green leaves.(Courtesy Photo / Mary F. Willson)
A male sockeye salmon spawns in Bristol Bay. (Courtesy Photo / Jonny Armstrong)

Pride of Bristol Bay: Life of a sockeye

It only took one sockeye to remind of how lucky I am to live in a world with wild salmon

A male sockeye salmon spawns in Bristol Bay. (Courtesy Photo / Jonny Armstrong)
Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire 
The author glasses harsh terrain on a beautiful October day on an unsuccessful hunt in 2015.

I Went to the Woods: The danger of overexposure

Outdoors content isn’t a monolith.

Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire 
The author glasses harsh terrain on a beautiful October day on an unsuccessful hunt in 2015.
This photo shows the colors of deciduous trees and bushes on the upper Delta River in Interior Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Alaska Science Forum: The season of senescence is upon us

Trees and other plants are simply shedding what no longer suits them.

This photo shows the colors of deciduous trees and bushes on the upper Delta River in Interior Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
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The Salmon State: An early fall trip to Hasselborg Lake

We were already happier, ready to skip our phones across the water like stones.

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The typical cocoon of a Caloptila moth, a leaf miner and leaf roller, with a plate-like cover over the pupa.

On the Trails: Small things living on leaves

I found a funny looking thing on the underside of an alder leaf.

The typical cocoon of a Caloptila moth, a leaf miner and leaf roller, with a plate-like cover over the pupa.
The author managed to take a grouse despite being deep in thought for a good half hour of his deer hunt. He made jalapeno poppers that night.
Internal dialogue of a hunter (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)

I Went to the Woods: The internal dialogue of a hunter

There is always something that comes to mind when I am outside.

The author managed to take a grouse despite being deep in thought for a good half hour of his deer hunt. He made jalapeno poppers that night.
Internal dialogue of a hunter (Jeff Lund / For the Juneau Empire)
Jeff Doty and Faisai Minhaj check traps baited with oats and peanut butter for voles and squirrels in Interior Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Jeff Doty and Faisai Minhaj check traps baited with oats and peanut butter for voles and squirrels in Interior Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
Elizabeth Graham, entomologist for the U.S. Forest Service, talks about the black-headed budworm outbreak in front of a spot on Mount McGinnis that shows the effects of defoliation. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
Elizabeth Graham, entomologist for the U.S. Forest Service, talks about the black-headed budworm outbreak in front of a spot on Mount McGinnis that shows the effects of defoliation. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
A yellow slime mold is an aggregation of separate cells that came together to reproduce; this one engulfs several plant stems. (Courtesy Photo / Mary F. Willson)

On the Trails: A good morning in the meadows

Yellow sun and slime mold.

A yellow slime mold is an aggregation of separate cells that came together to reproduce; this one engulfs several plant stems. (Courtesy Photo / Mary F. Willson)