History

Juneau voices: Locals share personal stories for new audio history project downtown

Juneau voices: Locals share personal stories for new audio history project downtown

For Anne Stepetin, a Tlingit Native from Angoon, it never gets easier to talk about the story.

 

Lawmakers honor first African American woman elected to the Alaska House

Lawmakers honor first African American woman elected to the Alaska House

The late Senator was the “conscience of the Legislature.”

 

Planet Alaska: A lesson from haa shagóon in 2020

Planet Alaska: A lesson from haa shagóon in 2020

The phrase means so much more than just “our ancestors.”

 

Opinion: Ferry system is shameful; Floathouse owner seeks photographs; Senatorial shortcomings
Opinion: Ferry system is shameful; Floathouse owner seeks photographs; Senatorial shortcomings
Then and Now: This photo composite shows what the Willoughby District looked like back what it was an Alaska Native village, and now in current day. The historic photograph by Winter and Pond is not dated, but was was taken sometime between 1893 and 1943, according to the Alaska State Library Historical Collections. (Collection number ASL-PCA-87). The photo on the right was taken Monday, June 24, 2019, on Willoughby Avenue by Juneau Empire photographer Michael Penn.
Then and Now: This photo composite shows what the Willoughby District looked like back what it was an Alaska Native village, and now in current day. The historic photograph by Winter and Pond is not dated, but was was taken sometime between 1893 and 1943, according to the Alaska State Library Historical Collections. (Collection number ASL-PCA-87). The photo on the right was taken Monday, June 24, 2019, on Willoughby Avenue by Juneau Empire photographer Michael Penn.
FDR’s New Deal helped preserve Alaska Native art, like these three totem poles in Juneau

FDR’s New Deal helped preserve Alaska Native art, like these three totem poles in Juneau

Rural Tennessee has electricity for the same reason Southeast Alaska has totem parks — the New Deal.

FDR’s New Deal helped preserve Alaska Native art, like these three totem poles in Juneau
The surprising humanity of 19th century 1,500-mile trek through Alaska
The surprising humanity of 19th century 1,500-mile trek through Alaska
Dig this: Art and science collide in new Ray Troll exhibition

Dig this: Art and science collide in new Ray Troll exhibition

Ketchikan artist has been drawing dinos with crayons for 61 years.

Dig this: Art and science collide in new Ray Troll exhibition
Keeping the light on: Alaska’s oldest lighthouse is in dire need of repairs
Video

Keeping the light on: Alaska’s oldest lighthouse is in dire need of repairs

It’s beautiful from afar, but close up you’ll see it’s crumbling.

Keeping the light on: Alaska’s oldest lighthouse is in dire need of repairs
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Jeff Smiths Parlor Museum recently restored by the National Park Service, July 18, 2017. (Courtesy Photo | National Park Service, Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Karl Gurcke)

Southeast In Sepia: Jefferson Randolph ‘Soapy’ Smith’s parlor

The building Soapy operated in Skagway has an interesting history.

Jeff Smiths Parlor Museum recently restored by the National Park Service, July 18, 2017. (Courtesy Photo | National Park Service, Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Karl Gurcke)
Thirty years after Exxon Valdez, Juneau organization working to keep waters safe
Thirty years after Exxon Valdez, Juneau organization working to keep waters safe
Silent in life, Tlingit code talkers finally getting recognition
Silent in life, Tlingit code talkers finally getting recognition
A memorial to the passengers and crew of the S.S. Princess Sophia at the Eagle Beach Recreation Area on Thursday, Oct. 25, 2018, 100 years after the ship hit Vanderbilt Reef and sunk in Favorite Channel. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Sophia centennial and day of sinking share stormy weather

Weather on Thursday’s centennial and the day of the Princess Sophia’s sinking shared a bit in common — but not to an eerie degree, said… Continue reading

A memorial to the passengers and crew of the S.S. Princess Sophia at the Eagle Beach Recreation Area on Thursday, Oct. 25, 2018, 100 years after the ship hit Vanderbilt Reef and sunk in Favorite Channel. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)
Craig Then and Now: The Presbyterians

Craig Then and Now: The Presbyterians

I was saddened to read recently that the Presbyterian Church of Sitka was planning to close its doors after more than a hundred years.

Craig Then and Now: The Presbyterians
Paula Haug, of Folsom, California, and her daughter, Carlie, visit the grave of Haug’s great-grandmother Soyla Valentina Cardwell Lockhart on Tuesday, July 17, 2018. Cardwell died in Juneau in 1918. With the help of the folks at Evergreen Cemetery, she was able to track down where Lockhart was buried and place a stone on her previously unmarked grave. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

A century later, woman who died in Juneau gets grave marker

Efforts of great-granddaughter lead to discovery of woman’s location, family history.

Paula Haug, of Folsom, California, and her daughter, Carlie, visit the grave of Haug’s great-grandmother Soyla Valentina Cardwell Lockhart on Tuesday, July 17, 2018. Cardwell died in Juneau in 1918. With the help of the folks at Evergreen Cemetery, she was able to track down where Lockhart was buried and place a stone on her previously unmarked grave. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)
Ellen Carrlee, objects conservator at the Alaska State Museum, watches Seth Irwin, a paper conservator from Boston, working at the Alaska State Museum on Sesquicentennial documents that will go on display later this year. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Alaska’s 150th anniversary: Juneau lab preserves historical documents

Everyone has enemies. Cats have dogs. Mice have cats. Dust mites have vacuum cleaners. Seth Irwin has Scotch Tape. For the past few weeks —and… Continue reading

Ellen Carrlee, objects conservator at the Alaska State Museum, watches Seth Irwin, a paper conservator from Boston, working at the Alaska State Museum on Sesquicentennial documents that will go on display later this year. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

This Day in Juneau History: March 13, 1987

On March 13, 1987, Juneau Girls Scouts celebrated the 75th anniversary since the national program’s founding. The celebration included balloons, singing, a birthday cake and… Continue reading

This Day in Juneau History: March 12, 1987

On March 12, 1987, Alaska Supreme Court Justice Jay Rabinowitz defended the state courts when speaking before the Alaska House and Senate. In Juneau, claims… Continue reading

This Day in Juneau History: March 10-11, 1987

On March 10, 1987, the City and Borough of Juneau Assembly started reviewing the exemptions list for the municipal sales tax to see where changes… Continue reading

This Day in Juneau History: March 9, 1987

On March 9, 1987, University of Alaska President Donald O’Dowd said that although there would be massive adjustments made to the UA system, academic programs… Continue reading