Carbon capture

Smokestack emissions into Fairbanks’ atmosphere are seen on March 1, 2023, from the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus. (Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)

Alaska legislators give closer look at bill aimed at storing carbon emissions underground

Bill could enable enhanced oil recovery, sequestration of emissions from new coal-fired power.

 

Smokestack emissions are seen along the Fairbanks skyline on March 1, 2023. At left is the coal-fired heat and power plant on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus. (Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)

Could a new Alaska coal power plant be climate friendly? An $11 million study aims to find out.

UA researchers plan to explore viability of injecting plant’s carbon emissions underground.

 

State Sen. Shelly Hughes, R-Palmer, talks with Sen. Jesse Kiehl, D-Juneau, right, following the Senate’s unanimous passage of carbon credits bill Monday. Hughes and Se. Mike Shower, center, voted for the bill despite voicing strong concerns about some of its provisions. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Carbon credits bill unanimously passes Senate, House quickly takes it up

Legislature seeks to OK priority bill for Dunleavy as part of package to adjourn session in time

 

Mitchell Haldane, Sealaska’s carbon offset administrator, surveys forest land owned by the Juneau-based Alaska Native corporation that has earned more than $100 million since 2016 by putting the property into California’s carbon credits markets, which is paying to keep the land unharvested for 100 years. (Screenshot from YouTube video by Sealaska Corp.)

Could it be easy being — and making — green?

State, Alaska Native corporations among those who see carbon market potential, but questions remain.

Mitchell Haldane, Sealaska’s carbon offset administrator, surveys forest land owned by the Juneau-based Alaska Native corporation that has earned more than $100 million since 2016 by putting the property into California’s carbon credits markets, which is paying to keep the land unharvested for 100 years. (Screenshot from YouTube video by Sealaska Corp.)
Gov. Mike Dunleavy explains his plan for Alaska to cash in on carbon credits during the unveiling of his proposed state budget for next year Dec. 15 at the Alaska State Capitol. He outlined legislation to enter carbon markets during a press conference Thursday in Anchorage. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire).

Governor previews carbon market bills

Dunleavy outlines legislation for plan he hopes will earn $900 million a year.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy explains his plan for Alaska to cash in on carbon credits during the unveiling of his proposed state budget for next year Dec. 15 at the Alaska State Capitol. He outlined legislation to enter carbon markets during a press conference Thursday in Anchorage. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire).