Iditarod

Iditarod winner Brent Sass poses for photos with lead dogs Morello, left, and Slater in the finish chute of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska, Tuesday March 15, 2022. (Anne Raup / Anchorage Daily News)

Sass wins his 1st Iditarod sled dog race across Alaska

“It’s awesome, it’s a dream come true.”

 

Sean Williams, a rookie musher from Chugiak, Alaska, takes his sled dogs through a snowstorm in downtown Anchorage, Alaska, on Saturday, March 5, 2022, during the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. The competitive start of the nearly 1,000-mile race will be held March 6, 2022, in Willow, Alaska, with the winner expected in the Bering Sea coastal town of Nome about nine days later. (AP Photo / Mark Thiessen)

Iditarod dogs pack Anchorage for race’s ceremonial start

The competitive race for mushers and their dogs starts Sunday in Willow.

 

Five-time Iditarod champion Dallas Seavey is shown Feb. 22, 2022, playing with Prophet, one of his lead dogs, at his kennel in Talkeetna, Alaska. Seavey is tied with musher Rick Swenson for the most Iditarod victories ever, and Seavey is looking for his sixth title when the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race starts this weekend in Alaska. (AP Photo / Mark Thiessen)

Musher on brink of becoming Iditarod’s best ever

Dallas Seavey is on the cusp of becoming mushing’s greatest ever champion…

 

This photo provided by the Alaska Wildlife Troopers taken March 9, 2021, Doug Ramsey, left, of Sundance Wyoming, poses with Alaska Wildlife Trooper Jason Kneier near a hole in the ice of a river in Swentna, Alaska. The two helped pull an 8-year-old boy from the water after he fell into the river. (Alaska Wildlife Troopers)

Troopers, Iditarod volunteer help rescue child from river

A course change put volunteer in place for rescue.

This photo provided by the Alaska Wildlife Troopers taken March 9, 2021, Doug Ramsey, left, of Sundance Wyoming, poses with Alaska Wildlife Trooper Jason Kneier near a hole in the ice of a river in Swentna, Alaska. The two helped pull an 8-year-old boy from the water after he fell into the river. (Alaska Wildlife Troopers)
Aliy Zirkle, of Two Rivers, greets fans as she passes by at the Iditarod Sled Dog Race start at Deshka Landing in Willow, Alaska, Sunday, March 7, 2021. (Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News)

Iditarod musher Zirkle injured, flown to Anchorage for care

By MARK THIESSEN Associated Press ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Iditarod musher Aliy Zirkle has been injured in this year’s race and flown to Anchorage in stable… Continue reading

Aliy Zirkle, of Two Rivers, greets fans as she passes by at the Iditarod Sled Dog Race start at Deshka Landing in Willow, Alaska, Sunday, March 7, 2021. (Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News)
Rick Casillo comes over the last drop as he comes down the Happy River Steps heading to Puntilla Lake, Alaska, during the 2014 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. The world’s most famous sled dog race starts Sunday, March 7, 2021, without its defending champion in a contest that will be as much dominated by unknowns and changes because of the pandemic as mushers are by the Alaska terrain. (Bob Hallinen / Anchorage Daily News)

Pandemic forces route change, other precautions for Iditarod

This year’s Iditarod will be marked by pandemic precautions, a route change, no spectators and more.

Rick Casillo comes over the last drop as he comes down the Happy River Steps heading to Puntilla Lake, Alaska, during the 2014 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. The world’s most famous sled dog race starts Sunday, March 7, 2021, without its defending champion in a contest that will be as much dominated by unknowns and changes because of the pandemic as mushers are by the Alaska terrain. (Bob Hallinen / Anchorage Daily News)
In this March 2018 photo,  Aliy Zirkle runs her team during the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Anchorage, Alaska. There has been another dramatic change to the world’s most famous sled dog race this year because of the pandemic, with officials announcing Friday, Feb. 5, 2021, that the ceremonial start has been canceled. (AP Photo / Michael Dinneen)

Iditarod drops ceremonial start over crowd-size concerns

Officials announced Friday that the ceremonial start has been canceled.

In this March 2018 photo,  Aliy Zirkle runs her team during the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Anchorage, Alaska. There has been another dramatic change to the world’s most famous sled dog race this year because of the pandemic, with officials announcing Friday, Feb. 5, 2021, that the ceremonial start has been canceled. (AP Photo / Michael Dinneen)
Joar Leifseth Ulsom, right, wearing a bib with ExxonMobil lettering on it, congratulates Peter Kaiser on his win in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska. The world’s most famous sled dog race has lost another major sponsor as the Iditarod prepares for a scaled-back version of this year’s race because of the pandemic, officials said Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021. ExxonMobil confirmed to The Associated Press that the oil giant will drop its sponsorship of the race. (Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News)

ExxonMobil becomes latest sponsor to sever Iditarod ties

The world’s most famous sled dog race has lost another major sponsor.

Joar Leifseth Ulsom, right, wearing a bib with ExxonMobil lettering on it, congratulates Peter Kaiser on his win in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska. The world’s most famous sled dog race has lost another major sponsor as the Iditarod prepares for a scaled-back version of this year’s race because of the pandemic, officials said Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021. ExxonMobil confirmed to The Associated Press that the oil giant will drop its sponsorship of the race. (Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News)
Associated Press                                In this March 2017 photo, volunteer handlers guide teams out of the dog yard and down the chute to the starting line of the 45th Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Fairbanks, Alaska. The world’s most famous sled dog race will go forward in 2021, and officials are preparing for every potential contingency now for what the coronavirus and the world might look like in March when the Iditarod starts.

Iditarod preps for any scenario as 2021 race plans proceed

The world’s most famous sled dog race will go forward in 2021.

Associated Press                                In this March 2017 photo, volunteer handlers guide teams out of the dog yard and down the chute to the starting line of the 45th Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Fairbanks, Alaska. The world’s most famous sled dog race will go forward in 2021, and officials are preparing for every potential contingency now for what the coronavirus and the world might look like in March when the Iditarod starts.