Arts and Culture

Writers’ Weir: Winter at Kona Reef, Hawaii

Writers’ Weir: Winter at Kona Reef, Hawaii

Upon the edge of Kona town lies a reef of great renown. Waves well up out of the deep to crash upon this famous reef.… Continue reading

Writers’ Weir: Winter at Kona Reef, Hawaii
Celebrating Little Norway

Celebrating Little Norway

Petersburg transforms the third weekend of May. The downtown is closed to traffic, stores load up stock, and people start arriving in droves. The Little… Continue reading

Celebrating Little Norway
Woodworking in the Tongass National Forest

Woodworking in the Tongass National Forest

Public lands surround Southeast Alaskans. The 17 million acre Tongass National Forest is where residents go to hike, camp, fish, and gather food to nourish… Continue reading

Woodworking in the Tongass National Forest
Mia Nevarez stands in front of Crescent Harbor in Sitka wearing a salmon dress that Cynthia Gibson made from 20,000 salmon vertebrae. (Photo by Bethany Goodrich)

Sitka woman makes dress from 20,000 salmon bones

Delicately yet firmly pinching the tiny vertebrae of a Chinook salmon between her thumb and pointer finger, Cynthia Gibson pushed fearlessly toward a rusty grinder… Continue reading

Mia Nevarez stands in front of Crescent Harbor in Sitka wearing a salmon dress that Cynthia Gibson made from 20,000 salmon vertebrae. (Photo by Bethany Goodrich)
The Canada, a Klondike gold rush shipwreck in Nahku Bay

The Canada, a Klondike gold rush shipwreck in Nahku Bay

At first glance she’s merely a stain on the beach visible only at low tide at the head of Nahku Bay, also known as Long… Continue reading

The Canada, a Klondike gold rush shipwreck in Nahku Bay
Some of the books that have recently arrived on the Capital City Weekly’s bookshelf. Mary Catharine Martin | Capital City Weekly

Summer Reading, Alaska-style

Here at the Capital City Weekly, we get a lot of books for review. Sadly, we can’t write about them all. Instead, we try to… Continue reading

Some of the books that have recently arrived on the Capital City Weekly’s bookshelf. Mary Catharine Martin | Capital City Weekly
A sketch from one of Tara’s schoolmates about delivering pizza to bush dwellers with a craving. Photo by Tara Neilson.

Pizza delivery in the wilderness

If there is one luxury bush dwellers envy city dwellers for, it’s pizza delivery. When I was a kid, every teacher of the bush school… Continue reading

A sketch from one of Tara’s schoolmates about delivering pizza to bush dwellers with a craving. Photo by Tara Neilson.
Juneau singer-songwriter Marian Call is seen in August 2016. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Two Juneau artists earn Rasmusson grants

More than 400 Alaskan artists applied for grants from the Rasmuson Foundation, and just 35 were chosen. Two of those artists are from Juneau, and… Continue reading

Juneau singer-songwriter Marian Call is seen in August 2016. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)
Stock image of an American robin.

Writers’ Weir: A spring poem by Jack Campbell

Kuskokwim Break-Up By Jack Campbell The river could visit new country tonight leaving the old river behind in a vast lake. Gone out in Napaimute.… Continue reading

Stock image of an American robin.
The members of Third Coast Percussion, Sean Connors, Robert Dillon, Peter Martin and David Skidmore, perform a free “brown bag” lunch-time concert in the atrium of the State Office Building on Monday as part of the 30th Annual Juneau Jazz and Classics Music Festival in 2016. Michael Penn | Juneau Empire

Juneau Jazz & Classics Festival returns for 31st season

This May will be Juneau Jazz & Classics Festival’s 31st season, but artistic director William Ransom’s first festival on the job. The founder of JJ&C,… Continue reading

The members of Third Coast Percussion, Sean Connors, Robert Dillon, Peter Martin and David Skidmore, perform a free “brown bag” lunch-time concert in the atrium of the State Office Building on Monday as part of the 30th Annual Juneau Jazz and Classics Music Festival in 2016. Michael Penn | Juneau Empire
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Redefining Native Art

On May 5 at the Alaska State Museum a new exhibit with artwork ranging from fishskin screens, weavings, masks and even remnants of moose antler… Continue reading

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Wetlands trash: balloon with frost. Photo by Helen Unruh.

Art in Unusual Places

The Capital City Weekly welcomes submissions of art in unusual or unexpected places. To submit, email your image, with caption, to editor@capweek.com.… Continue reading

Wetlands trash: balloon with frost. Photo by Helen Unruh.
Heather Dillon, who will be showing her work at Shoefly on First Friday, uses electricity to create interesting designs on jewelry made from Devil’s club. Courtesy image.

First Friday features Tlingit masks, devil’s club earrings

First Friday, Juneau’s monthly art gallery walk, takes place on the evening of May 5. Tlingit artwork from local weaver Lily Hope and devil’s club… Continue reading

Heather Dillon, who will be showing her work at Shoefly on First Friday, uses electricity to create interesting designs on jewelry made from Devil’s club. Courtesy image.

Capital City Weekly editor: ‘It’s been a real privilege’

I’ve spent the last four years writing and editing for the Capital City Weekly. Those four years have made for positive, lasting memories. I’ve been… Continue reading

Thinkstock

14 Southeast students receive arts scholarships

Fourteen students from northern Southeast Alaska — 10 from Juneau and four from Skagway — have been awarded a total of $7,000 in scholarship money… Continue reading

Thinkstock
Alaska Daily Empire office at 123 Main Street in 1913. John Troy, with mustache, is on the right. Alaska State Library Place File. Photographs, ASL. ASL-Juneau-People-11.

‘The Greatest Man in the History of Alaska’

In 1933, Franklin Delano Roosevelt appointed John Weir Troy as Alaska’s sixth territorial governor. Alaskans, in a rare moment of accord, greeted the president’s appointment… Continue reading

Alaska Daily Empire office at 123 Main Street in 1913. John Troy, with mustache, is on the right. Alaska State Library Place File. Photographs, ASL. ASL-Juneau-People-11.

Alaska State Improv Festival returns for fifth year of shows, workshops

Thanks to producer Eric Caldwell, co-producer M.D. Christenson and nearly a dozen volunteers, the Alaska State Improv Festival (AS IF) will be returning to Juneau… Continue reading

Reflection of the Governor’s Mansion in glass bricks. Photo by Brooke Daly.

Art in Unusual Places

The Capital City Weekly welcomes reader-submitted photos of art in unusual or unexpected places. To submit, email your photos and captions to editor Mary Catharine… Continue reading

Reflection of the Governor’s Mansion in glass bricks. Photo by Brooke Daly.
Ed Littlefield, with percussion instruments at top right, performs in Sitka. Courtesy image.

A musical line stretching through time

How do you define “music?” That’s something Ed Littlefield thought about for six months as part of an undergraduate class, it’s something he’s been thinking… Continue reading

Ed Littlefield, with percussion instruments at top right, performs in Sitka. Courtesy image.
A cockle-collector in Sitka holds up a cockle. Bethany Goodrich | Capital City Weekly

Southeast’s shellfish safety squad

Katlian Street in Sitka is a bustling cultural and fishing hub. Along this winding harbor-side road, tightly squeezed between fishing gear shops, processing plants, and… Continue reading

A cockle-collector in Sitka holds up a cockle. Bethany Goodrich | Capital City Weekly