Search Results for: SUSTAINABLE ALASKA

Gov. Mike Dunleavy signs legislation allowing the state to set up a carbon offset program Tuesday in Anchorage. Dunleavy signed the bill with Alaska lawmakers and administration officials standing behind him during the Alaska Sustainable Energy Conference at the Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center in downtown Anchorage. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

Dunleavy signs carbon ‘trees’ bill at sustainable energy conference

National and state leaders discuss Alaska’s green market prospects in-state and internationally

Gov. Mike Dunleavy signs legislation allowing the state to set up a carbon offset program Tuesday in Anchorage. Dunleavy signed the bill with Alaska lawmakers and administration officials standing behind him during the Alaska Sustainable Energy Conference at the Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center in downtown Anchorage. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)
This 2019 aerial photo provided by ConocoPhillips shows an exploratory drilling camp at the proposed site of the Willow oil project on Alaska's North Slope. Alaska's push to become a bigger player in the clean energy market is in the spotlight this week at a conference convened by Republican Gov. Mike Dunleavy, even as the state continues to embrace new fossil fuel production, including the controversial Willow oil project.   (ConocoPhillips)

‘Leap of faith:’ Alaska pursues carbon offset market while embracing oil

Alaska’s push to become a bigger player in the clean energy market is in the spotlight this week at a conference convened by its Republican… Continue reading

This 2019 aerial photo provided by ConocoPhillips shows an exploratory drilling camp at the proposed site of the Willow oil project on Alaska's North Slope. Alaska's push to become a bigger player in the clean energy market is in the spotlight this week at a conference convened by Republican Gov. Mike Dunleavy, even as the state continues to embrace new fossil fuel production, including the controversial Willow oil project.   (ConocoPhillips)
State Sen. Shelly Hughes, R-Palmer, talks with Sen. Jesse Kiehl, D-Juneau, right, following the Senate’s unanimous passage of carbon credits bill Monday. Hughes and Se. Mike Shower, center, voted for the bill despite voicing strong concerns about some of its provisions. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Carbon credits bill unanimously passes Senate, House quickly takes it up

Legislature seeks to OK priority bill for Dunleavy as part of package to adjourn session in time

State Sen. Shelly Hughes, R-Palmer, talks with Sen. Jesse Kiehl, D-Juneau, right, following the Senate’s unanimous passage of carbon credits bill Monday. Hughes and Se. Mike Shower, center, voted for the bill despite voicing strong concerns about some of its provisions. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
On a visit to Pokai Bay, Cruz shares the significance of the ancestral lands where she lives, on the Waianae coast of O’ahu. Cruz speaks to the battle that her community is enduring to protect their lands and leads prayers with the visitors from Southeast Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Lauren Tanel)

Resilient Peoples & Place: Cultural healing mission bonds Indigenous peoples across the Pacific

Tucked amongst the endless array of fog-coated islands that make up the Tongass National Forest, on the northwest edge of Kupreanof Island, is the small… Continue reading

On a visit to Pokai Bay, Cruz shares the significance of the ancestral lands where she lives, on the Waianae coast of O’ahu. Cruz speaks to the battle that her community is enduring to protect their lands and leads prayers with the visitors from Southeast Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Lauren Tanel)
Rep. Andrew Gray, an Anchorage Democrat, speak to a crowd outside at the steps of the Alaska State Capitol in January. Gray introduced a bill Monday that would make short-term rental registration a requirement and limit operators to just one unit per person in Alaska. (Mark Sabbatini/ Juneau Empire File)
Rep. Andrew Gray, an Anchorage Democrat, speak to a crowd outside at the steps of the Alaska State Capitol in January. Gray introduced a bill Monday that would make short-term rental registration a requirement and limit operators to just one unit per person in Alaska. (Mark Sabbatini/ Juneau Empire File)
A troller fishes in Sitka Sound, Alaska on February 2, 2021. A ruling from a U.S. judge in Seattle could effectively shut down commercial king salmon trolling in Southeast Alaska — a valuable industry that supports some 1,500 fishermen — after a conservation group challenged the harvest as a threat to protected fish and the endangered killer whales that eat them. (James Poulson / Daily Sitka Sentinel)

Ruling might cancel Alaska commercial king salmon season

The state of Alaska quickly announced an appeal.

A troller fishes in Sitka Sound, Alaska on February 2, 2021. A ruling from a U.S. judge in Seattle could effectively shut down commercial king salmon trolling in Southeast Alaska — a valuable industry that supports some 1,500 fishermen — after a conservation group challenged the harvest as a threat to protected fish and the endangered killer whales that eat them. (James Poulson / Daily Sitka Sentinel)
(Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)

Opinion: Another legislative session fails on the budget front

A fragmented approach to a complex problem is wrong.

  • Apr 28, 2023
  • By Rich Moniak
(Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)
This photo shows an Aleutian tern. Intentionally scheduled during the “slow season” to help boost the economy between the steelhead and sockeye runs, the Yakutat Tern Festival is a celebration of Yakutat’s natural and cultural resources, highlighted by the area’s Aleutian terns. The Yakutat Nature Society will host the 12th Annual Yakutat Tern Festival in Yakutat, from June 1 through June 4 — with a more robust schedule of events compared to recent years. (Courtesy Photo / Nate Catterson)

12th Annual Yakutat Tern Festival is not just for the birds

Southeast Alaska Birding Trail & Guide offers regenerative ways to see state, boost rural economies.

This photo shows an Aleutian tern. Intentionally scheduled during the “slow season” to help boost the economy between the steelhead and sockeye runs, the Yakutat Tern Festival is a celebration of Yakutat’s natural and cultural resources, highlighted by the area’s Aleutian terns. The Yakutat Nature Society will host the 12th Annual Yakutat Tern Festival in Yakutat, from June 1 through June 4 — with a more robust schedule of events compared to recent years. (Courtesy Photo / Nate Catterson)
The students and instructors of the University of Alaska Southeast’s Policy & Procedure Practicum course in the lobby of Anchorage’s Egan Center while attending the Federal Subsistence Board Meeting during the first week of February. (Lee House / Sitka Conservation Society)

Resilient Peoples & Place: Bringing the next generation’s voices to the table

“Getting engaged starts at the kitchen table with what you’re feeding your family.”

The students and instructors of the University of Alaska Southeast’s Policy & Procedure Practicum course in the lobby of Anchorage’s Egan Center while attending the Federal Subsistence Board Meeting during the first week of February. (Lee House / Sitka Conservation Society)
State Rep. Zack Fields

Opinion: Transformational policies for economic growth

Investing in people and energy could position Alaska to achieve unprecedented prosperity.

  • Apr 25, 2023
  • By Zack Fields
State Rep. Zack Fields
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Opinion: Wanted: Alaskans to help shape new bycatch rules

The public has a lot to say about bycatch in Alaska’s fisheries…

  • Apr 24, 2023
  • By Laine Welch
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A tag is place on a evidence bag containing small baggies of drugs seized by the Juneau Police Department. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Gov proposes managing opioid settlement money like Permanent Fund

$58 million from drug companies would go to new investment fund, earnings used for treatment

A tag is place on a evidence bag containing small baggies of drugs seized by the Juneau Police Department. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
Cindy Pederson, sets up a display table for raffle items in a hallway at Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall during the  88th annual Tribal Assembly of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska. Peterson, a Seattle resident and delegate for nearly 20 years until taking a job with the tribe’s COVID-19 relief program last year, was named the tribe’s Delegate/Citizen of the Year on Thursday. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Delegate/Citizen of the Year surprised by honor during Tribal Assembly

Long-term sustainable housing, and more also discussed on second day.

Cindy Pederson, sets up a display table for raffle items in a hallway at Elizabeth Peratrovich Hall during the  88th annual Tribal Assembly of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska. Peterson, a Seattle resident and delegate for nearly 20 years until taking a job with the tribe’s COVID-19 relief program last year, was named the tribe’s Delegate/Citizen of the Year on Thursday. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Southeast Alaska’s Chilkat River is seen on May, 30, 2013. The Chilkat and its main tributary, the Klehini River, are listed among the nation’s most at-risk rivers because of the planned Palmer Project copper and zinc mine being developed upstream from the village of Klukwan. (U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center)

Looming mine development puts Southeast’s Chilkat-Klehini system on list of endangered rivers

A pair of connected Southeast Alaska waterways are on the 2023 list of America’s Most Endangered Rivers issued by a national environmental organization. The Chilkat… Continue reading

Southeast Alaska’s Chilkat River is seen on May, 30, 2013. The Chilkat and its main tributary, the Klehini River, are listed among the nation’s most at-risk rivers because of the planned Palmer Project copper and zinc mine being developed upstream from the village of Klukwan. (U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center)
Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire 
Freshly printed paper makes it way through the Juneau Empire printing press Thursday evening. Beginning May 3, the Juneau Empire will be printed in Washington state, and delivered on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

From the editor and publisher

Ben Hohenstatt and David Rigas

  • Apr 17, 2023
Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire 
Freshly printed paper makes it way through the Juneau Empire printing press Thursday evening. Beginning May 3, the Juneau Empire will be printed in Washington state, and delivered on Wednesdays and Saturdays.
A U.S. Forest Service crew works on a riverbed project in the Tongass National Forest. (U.S. Forest Service)

Public ideas sought for long-term Tongass strategy

U.S. Forest Service to conduct online, in-person sessions during coming weeks for 10-year plan

A U.S. Forest Service crew works on a riverbed project in the Tongass National Forest. (U.S. Forest Service)
Assembly members listen to a discussion about the near and long-term future of Juneau’s solid waste management during “Talkin’ Trash” work session held by members of the Assembly Public Works and Facilities Committee Thursday afternoon. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)
Assembly members listen to a discussion about the near and long-term future of Juneau’s solid waste management during “Talkin’ Trash” work session held by members of the Assembly Public Works and Facilities Committee Thursday afternoon. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)
The series “Credible, Idiot Strings” features cotton fabric, nylon thread and steel wire to draw attention to the high rates of suicide in Alaska Native and Indigenous communities. The series is a part of the new exhibition “Visceral: Verity” on display at the Alaska State Museum and featured during the April First Friday. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire File)
The series “Credible, Idiot Strings” features cotton fabric, nylon thread and steel wire to draw attention to the high rates of suicide in Alaska Native and Indigenous communities. The series is a part of the new exhibition “Visceral: Verity” on display at the Alaska State Museum and featured during the April First Friday. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire File)
Trevor Fredrickson, Sam Fredrickson and Beebuks Kookesh hike down to the shore on the way to be picked up by a floatplane that would return them home, to Angoon. (Courtesy Photo / Mary Catharine Martin)

The Salmon State: Crossing Kootznoowoo — and exploring potential career paths

The 30-mile Cross-Admiralty Canoe Route could be seen as a straightforward trip: start in Angoon (Aangóon, or “isthmus town”), where Tlingit people have lived since… Continue reading

Trevor Fredrickson, Sam Fredrickson and Beebuks Kookesh hike down to the shore on the way to be picked up by a floatplane that would return them home, to Angoon. (Courtesy Photo / Mary Catharine Martin)
State Rep. Ben Carpenter, R-Nikiski, inquires about election legislation during a committee hearing Tuesday at the Alaska State Capitol. Carpenter, chair of the House Ways and Means Committee, is sponsoring bills to decrease business taxes and implement a 2% statewide sales tax that were heard. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Opinion: Proposal is a fiscal plan, but not a good one

The numbers don’t add up.

  • Apr 5, 2023
  • By Larry Persily
State Rep. Ben Carpenter, R-Nikiski, inquires about election legislation during a committee hearing Tuesday at the Alaska State Capitol. Carpenter, chair of the House Ways and Means Committee, is sponsoring bills to decrease business taxes and implement a 2% statewide sales tax that were heard. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)