Search Results for: SUSTAINABLE ALASKA

Cruise ship passengers walk around in downtown Juneau in late May. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire File)

Saturday will mark first day without cruise ships since early May

Nearly 1.5 million cruise ship passengers have arrived in Juneau so far this season.

Cruise ship passengers walk around in downtown Juneau in late May. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire File)
Nano Brooks, pictured, is running as an Assembly Areawide candidate in the 2023 City and Borough of Juneau municipal election. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

Get to know a candidate: Nano Brooks

Assembly Areawide candidate in the 2023 Juneau municipal election.

Nano Brooks, pictured, is running as an Assembly Areawide candidate in the 2023 City and Borough of Juneau municipal election. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)
U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg joined U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski on an Alaska state ferry on Wednesday, Aug. 16 during his first visit to Southeast Alaska. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Department of Transportation)

My Turn: Traveling the Alaska way

The night before my team and I were scheduled to fly from Juneau to Haines on Seaplanes with the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, Pete Buttigieg,… Continue reading

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg joined U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski on an Alaska state ferry on Wednesday, Aug. 16 during his first visit to Southeast Alaska. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Department of Transportation)
Two Alexander Archipelago wolves are seen March 21, 2020, in a trail camera image provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo)

Southeast Alaska wolves are not threatened or endangered, federal agency concludes

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service again rejects request to put them on Endangered Species List.

Two Alexander Archipelago wolves are seen March 21, 2020, in a trail camera image provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo)
The Hubbard state ferry remains in dock at the Auke Bay Ferry Terminal on Friday after suffering generator problems that are expected to keep the ship out of service until Monday. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

Hubbard likely out of service until Monday due to generator problems

Newest state ferry suffers failure after carrying Buttigieg from Juneau to Haines.

The Hubbard state ferry remains in dock at the Auke Bay Ferry Terminal on Friday after suffering generator problems that are expected to keep the ship out of service until Monday. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)
Simple weatherization techniques, like improving insulation and plugging up gaps in your home, can help homeowners lower their energy costs. Alaska Heat Smart, offer free home heating assessments, which analyze homes and their energy use to create a report about potential heat pump installation options, and weatherization suggestions. (Bethany Goodrich/ Sustainable Southeast Partnership)

Exploring needs and opportunities on anniversary of Inflation Reduction Act

Tips on using federal and regional incentives for a clean energy future for Southeast Alaskans.

Simple weatherization techniques, like improving insulation and plugging up gaps in your home, can help homeowners lower their energy costs. Alaska Heat Smart, offer free home heating assessments, which analyze homes and their energy use to create a report about potential heat pump installation options, and weatherization suggestions. (Bethany Goodrich/ Sustainable Southeast Partnership)
An artist depiction of a new city hall building in Juneau. (Courtesy Image / North Wind Architects)

My Turn: No-confidence vote for lame duck city manager

This column has been updated to clarify the definition of Alaska’s Open Meetings Act, which applies to governing bodies, but exempts individuals. The Open Meetings… Continue reading

An artist depiction of a new city hall building in Juneau. (Courtesy Image / North Wind Architects)
The Alaska flag flies from the bow of a boat in one of Ketchikan’s small-boat harbors on July 24. (Photo by James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)

With Alaska’s maritime heritage at risk of being lost, program seeks to preserve it

Alaska Maritime Heritage Preservation Program is open to funding projects by museums, others

The Alaska flag flies from the bow of a boat in one of Ketchikan’s small-boat harbors on July 24. (Photo by James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
Models walk along Ferry Way in downtown Juneau during Alaska Fashion Week’s runway show Saturday afternoon. Organizers said the event would take place outside rain or shine, but a heavy downpour during the morning gradually tapered off and stopped just before the start of the show. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)

Outdoor fashion show creates a splash

Rain goes away as models on the runway showcase designs during third annual Alaska Fashion Week

Models walk along Ferry Way in downtown Juneau during Alaska Fashion Week’s runway show Saturday afternoon. Organizers said the event would take place outside rain or shine, but a heavy downpour during the morning gradually tapered off and stopped just before the start of the show. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Brown bears at the McNeil River State Game Sanctuary. (Alaska Department of Fish and Game photo)

Opinion: Let’s make sure the Mulchatna massacre never happens again

I join the many Alaskans appalled by the revelation that state officials in planes and helicopters recently killed 94 brown bears (including 11 cubs), five… Continue reading

Brown bears at the McNeil River State Game Sanctuary. (Alaska Department of Fish and Game photo)
The Tongass National Forest includes 16.7 million acres and was established in 1907. The islands, forests, salmon streams, mountains and coastlines of Southeast Alaska are the ancestral lands of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian people who continue to depend on and care for their traditional territories. The Tongass was not created with the consent of Alaska Native people and today, the U.S. Forest Service is working to improve government-to-government relations with the federally recognized tribal governments of Southeast Alaska. (Bethany Goodrich / Sustainable Southeast Partnership)

Resilient Peoples & Place: ‘Caring for the Land and Serving People’

A conversation with U.S. Forest Service Tribal Relations Specialist Jennifer Hanlon.

The Tongass National Forest includes 16.7 million acres and was established in 1907. The islands, forests, salmon streams, mountains and coastlines of Southeast Alaska are the ancestral lands of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian people who continue to depend on and care for their traditional territories. The Tongass was not created with the consent of Alaska Native people and today, the U.S. Forest Service is working to improve government-to-government relations with the federally recognized tribal governments of Southeast Alaska. (Bethany Goodrich / Sustainable Southeast Partnership)
A female mountain goat on a rocky slope on Baranof Island. (Phil Mooney/Alaska Department of Fish and Game)

People now need to pass this quiz to hunt goats in Southeast Alaska

Officials hope online test helps hunters to identify and avoid shooting females.

A female mountain goat on a rocky slope on Baranof Island. (Phil Mooney/Alaska Department of Fish and Game)
The offices of the Alaska Permanent Fund Corp. are seen June 6 in Juneau. (Photo by James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)

New estimate shows Alaska’s Permanent Fund could be out of spendable money in 3-4 years

Annual transfer from the fund pays for more than half of Alaska’s general-purpose government spending

The offices of the Alaska Permanent Fund Corp. are seen June 6 in Juneau. (Photo by James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
In this June 21 photo, meteorologist David Percy films the daily “Alaska Weather” program in a makeshift studio at the National Weather Service office in Anchorage. The “Alaska Weather” program she oversees, the only weather show produced by the National Weather Service, will have its last on-air broadcast Friday after Alaska Public Media dropped distribution, forcing it to YouTube. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

How’s the weather up there? It’ll be harder for Alaska to tell as a longtime program goes off air

ANCHORAGE — Before Morris Nashoanak heads out for days in search of bearded seals, beluga whales or salmon, he catches the weather on TV. But… Continue reading

In this June 21 photo, meteorologist David Percy films the daily “Alaska Weather” program in a makeshift studio at the National Weather Service office in Anchorage. The “Alaska Weather” program she oversees, the only weather show produced by the National Weather Service, will have its last on-air broadcast Friday after Alaska Public Media dropped distribution, forcing it to YouTube. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)
Cans of smoked sockeye salmon line the shelves at the Alaska Seafood Company facility in Lemon Creek. The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska recently purchased the company and will begin operations by beginning of July, the tribe’s president told the Empire. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)

Tlingit and Haida purchases Alaska Seafood Company

The tribe’s president said the acquisition supports mission of economic sovereignty.

Cans of smoked sockeye salmon line the shelves at the Alaska Seafood Company facility in Lemon Creek. The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska recently purchased the company and will begin operations by beginning of July, the tribe’s president told the Empire. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)
Uhtred Permanentfundsen, the “defender of the Permanent Fund,” occupies a shelf near the head of the table in the Senate Finance Committee room at the Alaska State Capitol. The committee was responsible for adding to the state budget the formula being used to calculate this year’s Permanent Fund dividend, which is estimated to be $1,304. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire File)

This year’s PFD is a budget-balancing $1,304. Is this the new normal?

Dunleavy OKs lower dividend despite originally seeking a $3,800 “statutory” payout.

Uhtred Permanentfundsen, the “defender of the Permanent Fund,” occupies a shelf near the head of the table in the Senate Finance Committee room at the Alaska State Capitol. The committee was responsible for adding to the state budget the formula being used to calculate this year’s Permanent Fund dividend, which is estimated to be $1,304. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire File)
Salmon dries on a traditional rack on the beach in the Seward Peninsula village of Teller on Sept. 2, 2021. Salmon is a dietary staple for Indigenous residents of Western Alaska, and poor runs have created hardship. A new Alaska salmon task force mandated by federal law is now appointed and charged with producing a science plan within a year. (Photo by Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)

Alaska salmon task force charged with developing science plan

19 members appointed by federal and state leaders to spend a year on sustainable management

Salmon dries on a traditional rack on the beach in the Seward Peninsula village of Teller on Sept. 2, 2021. Salmon is a dietary staple for Indigenous residents of Western Alaska, and poor runs have created hardship. A new Alaska salmon task force mandated by federal law is now appointed and charged with producing a science plan within a year. (Photo by Yereth Rosen/Alaska Beacon)
Photos by Lee House / Sitka Conservation Society
Aliyah Merculief focuses on her run while snowboarding at Snow Camp.

Resilient Peoples & Place: Bringing up a new generation of Indigenous snow shredders

“Yak’éi i yaada xwalgeiní” (“it is good to see your face”) reads one of the first lines of a Lingít phrase sheet given to youth… Continue reading

  • Jun 2, 2023
  • By Lee House
Photos by Lee House / Sitka Conservation Society
Aliyah Merculief focuses on her run while snowboarding at Snow Camp.
(Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)

Opinion: Sustainability report is a greenwashing effort

Report leaves out “the not-so-pretty.”

  • May 27, 2023
  • By Matthew Jackson
(Peter Segall / Juneau Empire File)
An employee at Barnacle Foods in Juneau chops up bull kelp as it makes it was down a conveyor belt. The company is among many in Alaska seeking to use kelp for a variety of commercial and scientific purposes.(Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire file photo)

Seeking the rich rewards of sustainability

Economic as well as environmental prospects emphasized at second annual energy conference

An employee at Barnacle Foods in Juneau chops up bull kelp as it makes it was down a conveyor belt. The company is among many in Alaska seeking to use kelp for a variety of commercial and scientific purposes.(Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire file photo)