Woman charged in Fred Meyer robbery

Woman charged in Fred Meyer robbery

Jaimee Gilson allegedly stole 33 items before assaulting employee

A Juneau woman is facing multiple felony charges after allegedly stealing from Fred Meyer and hitting two employees who tried to stop her, according to charging documents.

A report from Juneau Police Department Officer Steve Warnaca alleges that Jaimee Marie Gilson, 30, stole 33 items worth an estimated $329 from Fred Meyer on the early afternoon of March 21. As Gilson left the store, Warnaca wrote, two Fred Meyer loss prevention employees tried to stop her.

Gilson “slapped and punched at” one of the employees and hit her in the jaw, the report alleges. Gilson then fled the scene in a white Jeep Grand Cherokee, but was later stopped by police. Officers searched her purse to find multiple stolen items, which she admitted to stealing, Warnaca wrote. Gilson told officers that she hit the employee because she didn’t want to be touched or stopped, the charging document states.

Gilson faces charges of second-degree robbery (a class B felony) and second-degree theft (a class C felony).

[‘Complicated’ murder trial scheduled for the fall, likely to be delayed further]

Drunk driver allegedly threatens police

Joshua Jayson Hunnel, 42, faces a felony driving under the influence charge, as well as charges of failing to stop at the direction of an officer and refusal to submit to a chemical test. According to charging documents, JPD Officer Alexander Smith responded to the report of an intoxicated man in the road near Davis Avenue.

Smith arrived and saw a white pickup truck parked in a no-parking area and put his flashers on. The driver turned up the music in the car when Smith approached, Smith wrote in his report, and Smith asked him to turn down the music. Instead, the man drove off, Smith wrote.

Officers tracked the car down to a home on Churchill Way. They found Hunnel in the house and smelled alcohol on his breath, the charging document states. Hunnel told the officers that he was going to “kill us and destroy our patrol cars,” Smith wrote in his report. Smith arrested Hunnel, put him into the patrol car and took him to the station.

At the station, Smith read Hunnel the legal requirement to provide a breath sample.

“While I was reading the advisement, Hunnel was blowing in my face stating that was his breath sample,” Smith wrote. “I smelled a strong odor of alcohol on his breath.”

Due to the earlier threats Hunnel had made, Smith decided it wasn’t safe to try and persuade Hunnel to comply with the breath test, he wrote in his report. Hunnel has four prior DUI convictions and was on felony probation for a DUI at the time of the most recent arrest, police say. Hunnel’s license was revoked at the time due to a previous DUI, Smith wrote.

[‘Justice shouldn’t create more victims’: Preaching patience for SB 91]

Other indictments

• Wylie Guy, 32, was indicted on charges of second-degree theft and second-degree burglary. Both charges are class C felonies.

• A 41-year-old man was indicted on charges of second-degree sexual assault and third-degree sexual assault. Charging documents allege the man went into the victim’s bed without consent and touched the victim inappropriately without consent. The name of the accused has been withheld to protect the identity of the victim. Second-degree sexual assault is a class B felony and third-degree sexual assault is a class C felony.

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