Fresh snow hits the lower slopes at the Eaglecrest Ski Area on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Fresh snow hits the lower slopes at the Eaglecrest Ski Area on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Weekend forecast: Wind and cold temperatures (but probably no snow)

“It’s looking dry …”

There’s a chance of snow in the capital city this weekend, but don’t hold your breath for it.

At least one weather model showed snow coming to Juneau over the coming days, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Pete Boyd, but there’s not a high probability of it coming to fruition.

“Right now we’re actually going to be looking dry for the weekend,” Boyd said in a Thursday interview. “Low-pressure system is much further to the south and we’re not really seeing it get up to the area to produce any significant precipitation for us. There is one model that is pushing it a little north, but we’re kind of looking at that as an outlier.”

Since Jan. 1, the capital city has received 37 inches of snow, less than halfway to the yearly average (1981-2010) of 87 inches. Should 2019 fail to reach that average, it would follow in line with the last five years of below-average snowfall, anywhere between 27 and 68 inches.

Boyd said there is a good chance of high winds downtown Friday night and Saturday, with gusts at least 40 mph.

“So it’s going to be cold, we’re more confident it’s going to be dry but we’re also looking at windy conditions for the weekend,” Boyd said. The high temperatures Saturday will be in the mid-30s.

There’s a chance snow could make an appearance at the beginning of next week.

“With that cold air in place we could get a start of some snow, but there’s once again a good amount of warm air moving up with it,” Boyd said.


• Contact reporter Nolin Ainsworth at 523-2272 or nainsworth@juneauempire.com.


More in News

Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File 
Michelle Ward and Anthony Davidson walk their children, Kyesin, 6, left, CJ, 5, center, and Callen, 2, down Seward Street as they visit downtown merchants for Halloween 2018. This year, downtown businesses are taking a pass on trick-or-treating. However, options for spooky fun and treat gathering abound.
Thrills and chills on tap for the capital city

Everything you need for your Halloween calendar

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the virus that causes COVID-19. Monoclonal antibodies may be a good treatment option for some people who test positive for the illness, according to state health officials. However, vaccination remains the best tool for limiting spread of COVID-19 and limiting hospitalizations. (NIAID-RML via AP, File)
COVID at a glance for Tuesday, Oct. 26

The latest local and state numbers.

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Tuesday, Oct. 26

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the virus that causes COVID-19. Monoclonal antibodies may be a good treatment option for some people who test positive for the illness, according to state health officials. However, vaccination remains the best tool for limiting spread of COVID-19 and limiting hospitalizations. (NIAID-RML via AP, File)
COVID at a glance for Monday, Oct. 25

The latest local and state numbers.

Charles Maier fills goodie bags at the Kenai Senior Center on Friday, Oct. 22, 2021 for next weekend’s drive-through trick-or-treat event. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
‘This has been a lifesaver’

Seniors seek human connection as pandemic continues.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the virus that causes COVID-19. Monoclonal antibodies may be a good treatment option for some people who test positive for the illness, according to state health officials. However, vaccination remains the best tool for limiting spread of COVID-19 and limiting hospitalizations. (NIAID-RML via AP, File)
COVID at a glance for Friday, Oct. 22

The latest local and state numbers.

Most Read