Dan Monteith (center) seen here with Luke Holton and Douglas Indian Association Council Member Barbara Cadiente-Nelson, during a panel discussion after a screening of Holton’s film, “Sayéik” in November 2018 at the Gold Town Theater, will be the speaker in an upcoming Sealaska Heritage Institute lecture. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire file)Theater. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)

Dan Monteith (center) seen here with Luke Holton and Douglas Indian Association Council Member Barbara Cadiente-Nelson, during a panel discussion after a screening of Holton’s film, “Sayéik” in November 2018 at the Gold Town Theater, will be the speaker in an upcoming Sealaska Heritage Institute lecture. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire file)Theater. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire File)

Upcoming lecture focuses on Douglas’ history and healing

It will be livestreamed.

Sealaska Heritage Institute is sponsoring a lecture concerning history and healing on Douglas Island.

The lecture will be livestreamed on SHI’s YouTube channel, https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTOynWRsH0EDYf1rw8oWV3w, from noon to 1 p.m., Friday, Sept. 11.

Dan Monteith, who has been an anthropology professor at University of Alaska Southeast for more than 20 years and has been researching events of historical trauma in Douglas and how the community can move forward toward healing since 2012, will be the lecture’s speaker.

Traumatic events on Douglas include the destruction of Native graves and a cemetery in the 1950s when the City of Douglas built a school over a burial site and the destruction of Native homes during the burning of the Douglas Indian Village.

The lecture is part of a series focusing on educational inequalities and injustices. Future lectures are scheduled for noon-1 p.m. on Sept. 15, 22 and 29.

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