In this Dec. 22, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks with reporters after signing the tax bill and continuing resolution to fund the government, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. On Friday, the president signed two bills by Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

In this Dec. 22, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks with reporters after signing the tax bill and continuing resolution to fund the government, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. On Friday, the president signed two bills by Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump signs two bills from Alaska Rep. Don Young

One deals with Ketchikan project; other benefits Kodiak

President Donald Trump has signed a pair of bills from Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska.

In a Friday ceremony, the president signed House resolutions 219 and 220, relating to hydroelectric projects near Ketchikan and on Kodiak Island.

“I’ve always supported an all-of-the-above energy approach in our state. With reliable energy production comes energy independence which is crucial for Alaska,” Young said in a prepared statement. “We know we have the capabilities to power our communities, particularly in Southeast Alaska, with renewable sources and these bills promote just that. With these bills signed into law, this will help local communities save money on energy costs and efficiently power their everyday lives.”

HR 219 requires the federal government to resurvey the boundaries of the Swan Lake Hydroelectric Project and convey additional land to the state.

HR 220 allows more water to be diverted into the Terror Lake Hydroelectric Project on Kodiak Island. That project is located within the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge and supplies most of the electricity to Kodiak.

Young has now had four bills signed into law during the 115th Congress. HR 228, signed into law on Dec. 18, relates to tribal job training programs. House Joint Resolution 69, signed into law on April 3, 2017, repealed hunting restrictions implemented by the Department of the Interior.

Young’s resolution allows predator control on wildlife refuges in Alaska and permits bait for bear hunting, among other things.


• Contact reporter James Brooks at jbrooks@juneauempire.com or 523-2258.


More in News

The Aurora Borealis glows over the Mendenhall Glacier in 2014. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Aurora forecast

Forecasts from the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute for the week of Jan. 29

Bus drivers picket outside the bus barn in Wasilla, Alaska on Jan. 26, 2023. Bus drivers in Alaska’s second-largest school district have gone on strike after delivering students to classes on Tuesday,  Jan. 31, citing unfair labor practices. (Loren Holmes / Anchorage Daily News)
Mat-Su school bus drivers strike

ANCHORAGE — Bus drivers in Alaska’s second-largest school district went on strike… Continue reading

The Juneau School District’s recently announced its new directors of teaching and learning support and student services who are set to start in their positions in July. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire File)
District selects new directors for teaching and learning support and student services

The new directors will take over their roles in the district in July.

The final Boeing 747 lands at Paine Field following a test flight, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2023, in Everett, Wash. Boeing bids farewell to an icon on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023, when it delivers the jumbo jet to cargo carrier Atlas Air. Since it debuted in 1969, the 747 has served as a cargo plane, a commercial aircraft capable of carrying nearly 500 passengers, and the Air Force One presidential aircraft, but it has been rendered obsolete by more profitable and fuel-efficient models. (Jennifer Buchanan / The Seattle Times)
Boeing bids farewell to an icon, delivers last 747 jumbo jet

SEATTLE — Boeing bid farewell to an icon on Tuesday: It’s delivering… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police calls for Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023

This report contains information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

President Joe Biden talks with reporters on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 30, 2023, after returning from an event in Baltimore on infrastructure. (AP Photo / Susan Walsh)
Biden to end COVID-19 emergencies on May 11

The move would formally restructure the federal coronavirus response.

Carla Casulucan, shareholder relations manager for Huna Totem Corp., gives public testimony Monday night in support of the Huna Totem development and urged the city to vote against an ordinance that would have allowed the city to spend $300,000 to help plan the location of a proposed cruise ship dock at the downtown subport. (Clarise Larson / Juneau Empire)
City decides against spending on cruise ship dock planning

Assembly votes down ordinance after more than a dozen public comments against it.

Eaglecrest Ski Patrol received a report of an avalanche in closed terrain in the East Bowl Chutes at 10:10 a.m. Thursday. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Most Read