Alaska State Virology Laboratory technician Ben Hedges holds vials of viral transport medium that are being tested for sterility. The lab manufactures the transport medium on site for use in COVID-19 testing in Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / JR Ancheta, University of Alaska Fairbanks)

Alaska State Virology Laboratory technician Ben Hedges holds vials of viral transport medium that are being tested for sterility. The lab manufactures the transport medium on site for use in COVID-19 testing in Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / JR Ancheta, University of Alaska Fairbanks)

State reports a low number of new COVID-19 cases

Daily numbers were low, but averages remain high

The state reported an additional 34 coronavirus cases Monday, only one of which was in Juneau.

The relatively low number of new cases comes on the heels of days on which the state reported 99, 99 and 129.

There are currently 24 active COVID-19 cases in Juneau, according to city data. Three people are currently hospitalized at Bartlett Regional Hospital.

Statewide there are 34 COVID-19-positive patients hospitalized and 3,635 active cases. There have been 232 total hospitalizations, according to state data.

No new deaths were reported by the state on Sunday or Monday, but the Department of Health and Social Services reported two new deaths on Saturday. So far, 42 residents have died with COVID-19, according to state data. One of the deceased was an Eagle River man over the age of 80, according to the state. The other was a Fairbanks woman over the age of 80. Both had underlying health conditions.

The state monitors it’s average case rate as the number of positive cases per 100,000 people in a 14-day window. According to the state’s COVID-19 data hub “this estimate can be used to monitor the general trajectory of disease spread and enables comparison between areas with different population sizes.”

[Vaccine distribution plan? Health officials say Alaska already has one]

According to state data, Juneau’s average daily rate for Sunday was 6.95 cases, with that number trending upward since the beginning of the month. The state’s 14-day averages have been trending downward, ending at 9.52 state data show. Both Juneau and the state are currently in what the state considers to be an “intermediate” alert level, which is an average daily rate of 5-10 people per 100,000. An average rate of more than 10 would raise the state to a “high alert” level.

The City and Borough of Juneau has its own alert system, currently at “Level 2 Moderate.” The state’s risk monitoring system doesn’t have any regulations for the general public built into it, but CBJ’s does. Each risk level comes with its own set of regulations which automatically go into effect when the city’s case count reaches a certain number. That happened in late August when gyms, bars and restaurants were asked to limit their capacity to 50%.

Members of the city’s emergency operations center, including City Manager Rorie Watt and Deputy City Manager Mila Cosgrove, who runs the EOC, will be giving weekly updates via Zoom webinar every Tuesday at 4 p.m.

This Tuesday, Sept. 8, EOC’s planning section chief Robert Barr will give a brief update on testing and vaccines, according to CBJ’s website.

Information on joining the webinar to ask questions is available at the city’s website. The webinar will be broadcast at the same time on the city’s Facebook page.

• Contact reporter Peter Segall at psegall@juneauempire.com. Follow him on Twitter at @SegallJnoEmpire.

More in News

Personnel from the Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska load a front-end loader aboard the vessel Frontrunner for transit to Haines to provide relief and assistance in recovery efforts in Haines following catastrophic rainfall-fueled landslides, Dec. 3, 2020. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)
State, local organizations respond to Haines disaster

Everyone from SAR specialists to tribal organizations to uniformed services are helping out.

Has it always been a police car? (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire)
Police calls for Friday, Dec. 4, 2020

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Thursday, Dec. 3

The most recent state and local numbers.

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Wednesday, Dec. 2

The most recent state and local numbers.

Rep. Lance Pruitt, R-Anchorage, speaks during the House Finance Committee meeting as they work on SB 128, the Permanent Fund spending bill, in the Bill Ray Center in 2016. (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Razor-thin state House race gets a recount

Recount starts Friday morning.

Gordon Chew uses a GoPro on a pole to assess the humpback entanglement while Steve Lewis carefully negotiates the full circumference of the whale. (Courtesy photo / Rachel Myron)
‘Small town’ residents rescue big animal

Nearly 20 people braved choppy seas and foul weather to free the snared whale

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Tuesday, Dec. 1

The most recent state and local numbers.

Most Read