State agency apologizes for debate tweets aimed at Trump

ANCHORAGE — An Alaska state agency is apologizing after political comments aimed at Donald Trump were posted on its official social media site.

KTOO reported that the posts to the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services Twitter account occurred during Monday night’s presidential debate between Trump and Hillary Clinton, including one that referred to Trump as a “red-face mansplainer.”

The station reports that agency spokeswoman Susan Morgan said in an email that department officials apologize.

She wrote: “Some recent tweets were inadvertently posted to our Twitter account by a DHSS staff member who was accidentally logged into the DHSS account instead of their personal account while on their personal phone at home.”

Morgan added: “The inadvertent tweets were deleted and we will be reviewing the matter in the days ahead to ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

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