Lily Hope tells a story of raven, king salmon and the birds to second grade students from Harborview Elementary, Montessori Borealis and Juneau Charter Community School at the Walter Soboleff Center on Friday Nov. 30, 2018. The Storytelling Excursion for all Juneau School District second graders is part of the Any Given Child programming sponsored by the Juneau School District, Mayor’s office, University of Alaska Southeast, Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Juneau Arts and Humanities Council. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

Lily Hope tells a story of raven, king salmon and the birds to second grade students from Harborview Elementary, Montessori Borealis and Juneau Charter Community School at the Walter Soboleff Center on Friday Nov. 30, 2018. The Storytelling Excursion for all Juneau School District second graders is part of the Any Given Child programming sponsored by the Juneau School District, Mayor’s office, University of Alaska Southeast, Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Juneau Arts and Humanities Council. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire)

SHI welcomes second-graders, JAHC members can buy Wearable Art tickets

News briefs for the week of Dec. 5, 2018.

SHI welcomes second-graders

Sealaska Heritage Institute opened the Walter Soboleff Building to all second-grade students in the Juneau School District as part of a national program to provide experiences and learning in the arts to all children.

The event is part of the Ensuring the Arts for Any Given Child initiative established by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts to create equitable access to arts education programs and resources for K-8 students. The Kennedy Center works with 25 sites in the country. Juneau was selected as the 11th site in 2013.

Sealaska Heritage first participated in the program in 2015 and the arts excursions are slated to occur annually each November.

The program provides an opportunity for SHI to expose children to Southeast Alaska Native cultures, said SHI President Rosita Worl in a press release.

“It is so important to teach children about the Native worldview to promote cross-cultural understanding,” Worl said. “We are thrilled that school children will come to the Walter Soboleff Building to learn about the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian.”

Roadless Rule committee submits final report

ANCHORAGE — The Alaska Roadless Rule Citizen Advisory Committee finalized a report for the state of Alaska to consider when providing input on state-specific Roadless Rule for the Tongass National Forest. The State is one of several cooperating agencies working with the U.S. Forest Service as it prepares a draft environmental impact statement for the state-specific rule.

The committee was established by Gov. Bill Walker to advise the state on future management of inventoried roadless areas in the Tongass. Members were appointed by Walker in late September and asked to submit a report to the state by late November. The committee’s report is posted at www.merid.org/AKroadless and has been shared with the Forest Service as part of the ongoing cooperating agency review.

Last week, Walker met with the committee to discuss the report. He praised the committee for its dedicated efforts over the past two months to gather public input and develop options.

The committee developed four options in its final report. All four options would allow roadbuilding and associated tree cutting in roadless areas of the Tongass for projects associated with transportation and utilities, mining, hydroelectric and other renewable energy, cultural uses, and habitat and forest health improvement. The options also include removing certain locations from the roadless inventory to allow for commercial timber harvest and other economic development activities, while retaining or designating additional areas for conservation of their roadless values.

Wearable Art 2019 tickets available for JAHC members

The Juneau Arts & Humanities Council is pleased to announce the next phase of tickets sales for the 2019 Wearable Art Extravaganza: Turbulence.

Tickets are as of Dec. 1 available for JAHC members and to major donors to the JAHC and Groundbreaker contributors to the New Juneau Arts & Culture Center. They will remain on sale exclusively to that group until Jan. 15, when remaining tickets will be available for the general public.

Each member will be allowed to buy no more than six tickets.

Wearable Art 2019: Turbulence will take place on Saturday, Feb. 16 at 8 p.m. and on Sunday, Feb. 17 at 3 p.m. at Centennial Hall, 101 Egan Drive.

For more information about JAHC, visit www.jahc.org or call (907)586 2787.

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