The Juneau Police Department, March 20, 2020. (Michael S. Lockett | Juneau Empire)

Police to allow beards, purple hair for child cancer awareness

The fundraiser will last for two months.

The Juneau Police Department announced Friday that it will be participating in a national anti-cancer campaign started by an organization called the Cure Starts Now.

In this case, by allowing beards and hair coloring.

“The group reached out to us and invited us to participate. Seems like a great way to help raise money for cancer research. It’s also a good morale booster,” sait JPD Lt. Krag Campbell in an email. “With all the issues going on in the world right now, as well as our day to day jobs, it can be pretty exhausting on people. So we thought this would be something positive. It is also something we can invite the community to take part in as well. So we hope people will consider doing this with us.”

[Authorities investigate probable downtown arson]

Male officers and staff will be allowed to grow beards, and female officers and staff will be allowed to color hair and nails purple if they donate for the voluntary campaign, Campbell said. All donations go to the Cure Starts Now nonprofit.

“This is the first time our entire department has participated in a campaign like this. We have had some of our detectives and admin staff do “No Shave November” for mustaches,” Campbell said. “This is a first in JPD history for beards. At least as far as I’m aware of.”

The campaign will run from Nov. 1 to Jan. 4, 2021, Campbell said.

• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at (757) 621-1197 or mlockett@juneauempire.com.

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