Kensey Jenkins (foreground, right) performs as a Lilac Fairy Attendant during a rehearsal for Juneau Dance Theatre’s “Spring Showcase” on Thursday, May 6. The showcase will be available to stream at certain times on May 14, 15 and 16. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Kensey Jenkins (foreground, right) performs as a Lilac Fairy Attendant during a rehearsal for Juneau Dance Theatre’s “Spring Showcase” on Thursday, May 6. The showcase will be available to stream at certain times on May 14, 15 and 16. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Juneau Dance Theatre springs into action

Annual showcase to be available as streaming event.

You’ve got to be quick on your feet to bring a dance recital to the public in the lingering days of a nearly unprecedented pandemic.

Juneau Dance Theatre has found a way to present its “Spring Showcase” via a streaming event. The recorded shows will be available to watch at set times on May 14, 15 and 16.

“JDT is beyond thrilled to be back in the theater doing what we love,” said Juneau Dance Theatre artistic director Zachary Hench in an email. “Even through masked faces, you can see the excitement and enchantment of the theater in the students’ eyes.”

[TMHS student again earns top billing in duck stamp contest]

The showcase will last about 90 minutes without intermission, according to a news release announcing the streams. It is sponsored by Bartlett Behavioral Health and features a collaborative piece with music composed by William Todd Hunt, and choreography by Anna McDowell.

Bridget Lujan, executive director for Juneau Dance Theatre, said the chance for students to perform a piece set to original music is something that “never, never, never” happens.

Lauryn Campos rehearses in “Blurred Visions” ahead of Juneau Dance Theatre’s “Spring Showcase.” “Blurred Visions” is collaboration between JDT alum Anna McDowell and Orpheus Project artistic director William Todd Hunt. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Lauryn Campos rehearses in “Blurred Visions” ahead of Juneau Dance Theatre’s “Spring Showcase.” “Blurred Visions” is collaboration between JDT alum Anna McDowell and Orpheus Project artistic director William Todd Hunt. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

“We’re extremely excited about the world premiere of ‘Blurred Visions,’” Hench said. “It’s a collaboration between JDT alum Anna McDowell, and artistic director of Juneau’s Orpheus Project, William Todd Hunt. The two artists worked together to create a beautiful new work. The music was created for the dance, and the dance was created for the music. Be sure to look out for a unique, behind the scenes interview where they talk about the collaborative process in our upcoming virtual performances.”

Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire
Ruby Rivas, as the Fairy of Songbirds, performs May 6 during a rehearsal for Juneau Dance Theatre’s “Spring Showcase.”

Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire Ruby Rivas, as the Fairy of Songbirds, performs May 6 during a rehearsal for Juneau Dance Theatre’s “Spring Showcase.”

The showcase will also feature “The Dancing Garden,” which is a compilation performed by the theater’s youngest students along with music from “In Gabriel’s Garden;” tap students will perform “Quarantine Jazz;” and intermediate and advanced students will perform excerpts from Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s “The Sleeping Beauty.” Advanced students will perform “Garland Waltz” and the ballet’s prologue. Graduating seniors will conclude the showcase, with a revival of “Natasha,” from Matthew Neenan’s ballet, “11:11.”

Lauryn Campos (left, in blue), Ruby Rivas (center, in yellow), Luna Ewing (center-right, in pink) and Jasmin Holst (right, in purple) hold a pose during a rehearsal for Juneau Dance Theatre’s “Spring Showcase” on Thursday, May 6. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

Lauryn Campos (left, in blue), Ruby Rivas (center, in yellow), Luna Ewing (center-right, in pink) and Jasmin Holst (right, in purple) hold a pose during a rehearsal for Juneau Dance Theatre’s “Spring Showcase” on Thursday, May 6. (Ben Hohenstatt / Juneau Empire)

“This year’s ‘Spring Showcase’ is a diverse program that features classical ballet, tap and contemporary styles of dance, performed by all levels from our youngest dancers to our graduating seniors,” Hench said. “There are several world premieres choreographed by our talented faculty, as well as excerpts from The Sleeping Beauty, set to Tchaikovsky’s famous score.”

Know & Go

What: Juneau Dance Theatre’s “Spring Showcase”

When: The event is not on-demand. Shows will stream at 7 p.m. Friday, May 14; 7 p.m. Saturday, May 15; and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 16.

Where: Online.

Admission: Tickets to stream the event are $15 per device, available at http://juneaudance.org/spring-showcase/. Cast 1 and Cast 2 distinction for streaming access, refers to the dancers performing “The Sleeping Beauty” fairy solos.

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