U.S. Coast Guard Station Juneau personnel unload a truck with canned goods that were donated for the Coast Guard’s annual Haunted Station. (Courtesy Photo | Southeast Alaska Food Bank)

U.S. Coast Guard Station Juneau personnel unload a truck with canned goods that were donated for the Coast Guard’s annual Haunted Station. (Courtesy Photo | Southeast Alaska Food Bank)

Haunted Station donation surpasses last year’s total

The turnout and amount of donations increased this year.

In just two nights, the U.S. Coast Guard Station Juneau’s Haunted Station welcomed more people and collected more food than it did last year.

According to social media posts from the station and the Southeast Alaska Food Bank, the Haunted Station welcomed 1,543 guests and collected 1,636 pounds of food to donate to the food bank. Last year, according to what the Coast Guard posted at the time, there were about 1,100 guests and more than 1,200 pounds of food donated in three days in 2017.

[Photos: U.S. Coast Guard’s Haunted Station]

Darren Adams from the Southeast Alaska Food Bank said in an interview Thursday that the amount of food was actually over 1,400 pounds last year. The increased poundage was “a huge, unexpected surprise,” Adams said.

Even before the donation from the Haunted Station, the Coast Guard was donating to the food bank in October through a program called Feds Feed Families, Adams said. Through this national program, federal agencies collect food in the fall to donate to local food banks. Adams said the Coast Guard had already collected more than 600 pounds in October before the large donation this week from the haunted attraction.

Coast Guard Fireman Jacob Campbell said the Haunted Station has been popular in part because it appeals to all ages and they make it easy to leave the station if someone can’t quite handle the scares. Campbell also said people can tell how much work goes into it. He said they put a lot of hours into it and as of Thursday they were still cleaning up.

“We’re not in there with cheap costumes and half-screams,” Campbell said. “My voice is still coming back from the Haunted Station.”

More in News

Thin ice sheets form near the Mendenhall Glacier in early November. (Courtesy Photo / Kenneth Gill, gillfoto)
Wild Shots: Photos of Mother Nature in Alaska

Reader-submitted photos of Southeast Alaska.

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Sunday, Nov. 28, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

A cuddle-puddle of kittens nestles at Juneau Animal Rescue, which recently received a large legacy gift from a Juneau resident. (Michael S. Lockett / Juneau Empire)
Juneau resident leaves one last gift for local nonprofits

The gift will help support organizations who made possible what she loved doing in life.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a Glance for Wednesday, Nov. 24

Numbers come from reports from the City and Borough of Juneau Emergency… Continue reading

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Thursday, Nov. 25, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, yellow, emerging from the surface of cells, blue/pink, cultured in the lab. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, NIAID-RML
COVID at a Glance for Monday, Nov. 22

Numbers come from reports from the City and Borough of Juneau Emergency… Continue reading

1
Alaska man pleads not guilty to threatening 2 US senators

If convicted, he could face a maximum sentence of 50 years in prison.

It's a police car until you look closely and see the details don't quite match. (Juneau Empire File / Michael Penn)
Police calls for Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Most Read