Juneau Empire Managing Editor Emily Russo Miller, pictured when she was hired as a reporter at the Juneau Empire in September 2011. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

Juneau Empire Managing Editor Emily Russo Miller, pictured when she was hired as a reporter at the Juneau Empire in September 2011. (Michael Penn | Juneau Empire File)

From the Editor: A fond farewell

I am just simply overwhelmed with gratitude.

The sky is white and overcast today, and the rain falls in Gastineau Channel. Two red-breasted mergansers wade around the fishing dock that is just outside the Juneau Empire on Channel Drive. There are usually two eagles perched on the dock’s piers, but not today. The tide is high.

Standing outside the Empire building, meditating on the shore, has been a secret pleasure since I arrived here eight and a half years ago. I stand in front of the mountains, and as I observe them, I know they are observing me as well.

I remember my old boss, back when he was interviewing me for a reporting position for the Empire in the fall of 2011, describing the newspaper — it’s located next to a world-class salmon hatchery! he exclaimed — and what Juneau was like. I moved here sight unseen that September.

After a long and beautiful journey, today marks my last day at the newspaper. I am moving on to pursue a new opportunity, one very close to my heart. I will be doing communications work for a local conservation group.

As I prepare to leave, I am just simply overwhelmed with gratitude.

I am grateful for all of the Empire’s readers and supporters who believe that the capital city needs and deserves a top-rate publication, dedicated to telling the stories of those who live here, and holding those in power accountable. Looking back, I am amazed by all the people in Juneau who have let me into their lives and homes to interview them, so I could try to do their story justice. I am grateful for all those who have reached out to me over the years, sharing their tips, thoughts and concerns, all for the betterment of the paper. I am grateful for all my current and past employees, who are so talented and creative and made me better at my job and a better person. I am grateful for all the leaders at the Empire over the years who have given me opportunities to grow and develop, and for their support and guidance.

When I first moved here in 2011, I told myself I would stay for two years. I had no idea at the time that I would plant roots here, that I would continue to choose to live and work here. I had no idea it would become my home.

Thank you, Juneau. It’s been an honor.

— Emily Russo Miller, Managing Editor

More in News

Jasmine Chavez, a crew member aboard the Quantum of the Seas cruise ship, waves to her family during a cell phone conversation after disembarking from the ship at Marine Park on May 10. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire file photo)
Ships in port for the week of June 22

Here’s what to expect this week.

Tim Berry, a Michigan resident visiting Juneau, fishes on a dock Monday near the Douglas Island Pink and Chum Inc.’s Macaulay Salmon Hatchery. A ban catching king salmon near the hatchery and some other Juneau waters is in effect until Aug. 31. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Local king salmon ban not expected to have big impact on summer fishing, but long-term concerns remain

Ban due to 2020 landslide that caused hatchery pipeline break, disrupting multiyear spawning cycle

Juneau School District maintenance and custodial crew work on transitioning Thunder Mountain High School to Thunder Mountain Middle School on Monday. (Jasz Garrett / Juneau Empire)
Juneau schools empty out as classrooms and memories transition under consolidation plan

Transitions “ahead of schedule” for school district; use for vacant buildings by CBJ still in question

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Sunday, June 23, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Buck Laukitis’ boat, the Oracle, sits in Homer in May before unloading its catch of halibut. (Nathaniel Herz/Northern Journal)
As salmon season kicks off, some Alaska fishermen fear for their futures

Some signs of recovery for $6 billion industry a year into crisis, but major threats persist.

A cartoon sketch is seen on a cubicle in the offices of the Alaska Permanent Fund Corp. during an open house on Friday, Feb. 16. (James Brooks/Alaska Beacon)
After email leak, some Alaska legislators say they’re skeptical of Permanent Fund’s direction

Members of the Alaska Legislature questioned the direction of the Alaska Permanent… Continue reading

City and state leaders gather Monday at the gangway to Aurora Harbor for a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the completion of the third of four stages of reconstruction of the 60-year-old harbor. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
Six years and one pandemic later, next stage of Aurora Harbor expansion is complete

New installations allow for longer vessels, provide utilities for final planned phase of project.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Saturday, June 22, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire file photo)
Police calls for Friday, June 21, 2024

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Most Read