Distance Defined, an Anchorage-based metalcore band, will be one of the three bands to rock the Juneau Arts & Culture Center Friday Sept. 28. (Courtesy Photo | Distance Defined)

Distance Defined, an Anchorage-based metalcore band, will be one of the three bands to rock the Juneau Arts & Culture Center Friday Sept. 28. (Courtesy Photo | Distance Defined)

Former Juneauites ready to show their metal

Distance Defined part of hard-rocking show at JACC

When Distance Defined plays the Fall Freakshow, it will be a homecoming of sorts for the Days brothers.

Guitarist Trevyn Days and bassist Trentyn Days are from the capital city, and Trevyn said he remembers a fairly vibrant metal community when he played with Little Embrace and his brother played in Lessons from Failure.

“That was six or seven years ago, so I don’t know how it’s going to be. It’s an all ages show, but there will be a designated 21-and-older section sponsored by McGivney’s,” Trevyn Days recently told the Capital City Weekly. “We’re trying to reach everyone.”

He was more certain about what the four-piece metalcore band from Anchorage will bring to the stage when they play Friday, Sept. 28 at the Juneau Arts & Culture Center.

“We are very energetic,” Trevyn Days said. “We move around a lot, and we stay very tight. We don’t sound like a big wall of noise, we’re very organized in what we do.”

It’s a style that’s been honed opening for bands like August Burns Red and playing Salmonfest in the Kenai Peninsula.

Plus, Trevyn Days said he’s excited for Before You’re Nothing and Psychotics, who will also play.

Ahead of the hard-rocking Juneau show, Trevyn Days also took some time to talk about his band and what it’s like to bring metal to the home of the Alaska Folk Festival.

Q: Where does the name come from?

A: This started with a posting online looking for a metal guitarist, so I sent over some examples of what I can do. I live in Homer. It’s about 5 1/2 hours away if you’re driving from some of the other guys. We all just kind of decided let’s write some music and send some tracks online. We didn’t really know what to call the files we were sending, so we started filing under them under the name Distance … We were all kind of sitting down thinking of a name, and my wife, said, ‘What do you think of the name Distance Defined?’ It just kind of struck a chord.

Q: Who are your influences?

A: Killswitch Engage, Architects, Wage War, Fit for a King. Those are some big-name bands we all kind of like.

Q: Favorite subgenre of metal?

A: Our band’s genre kind of sums up our favorite subgenere because we like to make music that we like to listen to: Metalcore. We like heavy guitars, and a more melodic breakdown, and our lead singer (Rollin Ritter) has an excellent singing voice. It always seems to be some kind of mix between super heavy and melodic and pretty.

Q: What can people expect at a Distance Defined show?

A: We spend a lot of time making sure we’re very tight as a band, that what you hear on the album is what you hear live. That can be a challenge. I actually have a loop station with pre-recorded guitar tracks, and our drummer (Tim Vinson) plays with a click track. On top of that, both the bassist and I are very capable singers and screamers. We fill it out more than you might expect from four people. You’ll notice we like what we do. We are very energetic. We move around a lot, and we stay very tight. We don’t sound like a big wall of noise, we’re very organized in what we do.”

Q: What is it like bringing metal to a what most probably consider to be a folk city?

A: I live in Homer now, but I was born and raised in Juneau. I know the town very well. As we got older and started playing in bars, there was a pretty good group there, even though it was super known for being folky. That was six or seven years ago, so I don’t know how it’s going to be. It’s an all ages show, but there will be a designated 21-and-older section sponsored by McGivney’s. We’re trying to reach everyone. Even if it may not be your style of music, you might be able to sit down grab yourself a drink and enjoy it.

Know & Go

What: The Fall Freakshow

Where: Juneau Arts & Culture Center

When: 7 p.m., Friday, Sept. 28.

Admission: $15. Tickets can be purchased at McGivney’s, Hearthside Books, Juneau Arts and Culture Center, Rainy Retreat or online at www.jahc.org.

Recently put out new single, “Voids” up on iTunes, Spotify and Apple Music, and also have an album “Destinations” out and “Hollow Hearts” and a music video will be forthcoming.

Want to hear them ahead of the show?

Distance Defined’s album “Destinations” is available on Spotify, iTunes and Apple Music, and the band recently released a new single “Voids.”

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