Downtown drive-by shooter pleads guilty

A Juneau man accused of firing a bullet that landed just inches away a person’s head pleaded guilty Thursday in Juneau Superior Court to felony weapons misconduct.

Jose Antonio Delgado, 47, accepted a plea deal that reduces the weapons charge from a class A felony to a class B felony, and dismisses two other felony assault charges that a Juneau grand jury indicted him of in March. Police arrested Delgado in February after he and Sky Stubblefield, 26, purportedly evaded arrest following a shooting downtown.

Prosecutors say Delgado fired a bullet from a car at a man walking near Harris Street because he thought the man had stolen his dog, according to an affidavit. The bullet flew past the man on the street and entered a house owned by Juneau resident James Barrett, where he was almost shot in his head.

Delgado’s trial was scheduled to begin early next month.

The proposed plea deal would sentence Delgado to five years in prison, with two years suspended, which is three years to serve. Delgado would also have to be on probation for five years after that.

Judge Louis Menendez will review the recommended plea deal and hand down a sentence after a pre-sentence report is completed at the end of July. The class B felony Delgado now faces is punishable up to 10 years in prison with a maximum fine of $100,000.

Stubblefield, the supposed driver during the shooting, continues to face one misdemeanor charge of failing to stop at the direction of an officer, punishable by up to one year in prison. She is slated to stand trial July 6.

• Contact reporter Paula Ann Solis at 523-2272 or paula.solis@juneauempire.com.

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