Municipal elections for the City and Borough of Juneau will be held on Oct. 6, 2020, now that candidates have been finalized. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

Municipal elections for the City and Borough of Juneau will be held on Oct. 6, 2020, now that candidates have been finalized. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

Assembly, school board candidates finalized for October municipal elections

Eight Assembly candidates will vie for three seats.

The City and Borough of Juneau Monday afternoon finalized the slate of verified candidates for the municipal election in October.

Three candidates stand for election for the two seats on the Juneau School District Board of Education, and eight total candidates stand for three different seats on the Assembly.

For the areawide seat on the Assembly, a three-year obligation, Maria Gładziszewski stands for reelection. In District 1, loosely defined as Douglas and downtown, two candidates seek election for a three-year term. Alicia Hughes-Skandijs, who was selected to replace Jesse Kiehl when he was elected to state senate and who was subsequently elected to the Assembly on her own for a one-year term will square off against Kenny Solomon-Gross.

[‘He never traveled without him’: Former Juneauite, beloved pet die less than 2 days apart]

In District 2, the Mendenhall Valley, Auke Bay and out the road, five candidates will vie for the seat vacated by Rob Edwardson, a three-year term. Robert Shoemake, Lacey Derr, Derek Dzinich, Christine Woll and current school board member Emil Robert Mackey III will vie for the single position.

The municipal election will take place on Oct. 6, 2020. It will be a vote-by-mail election.

• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at 757-621-1197 or lockett@juneauempire.com.

More in News

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Friday, Jan. 22

The most recent state and local numbers.

A Coast Guard Station Juneau 45-foot Response Boat-Medium patrols Auke Bay during an exercise in 2018. A response boat similar to the one in the photo was struck by a laser near Ketchikan on Saturday, Jan. 17, prompting an investigation into the crime. (Lt. Brian Dykens / U.S. Coast Guard)
Coast Guard wants information after laser pointed at boat

“Laser strikes jeopardize the safety of our boat crews…”

The valleys of Jim River and Prospect Creek in northern Alaska, where an official thermometer registered Alaska’s all-time low of minus 80 degrees F on Jan. 23, 1971. Photo by Ned Rozell
Alaska’s all-time cold record turns 50

The camp was there to house workers building the trans-Alaska pipeline

This 2020 electron microscope image provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows SARS-CoV-2 virus particles which causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells cultured in a lab. On Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, the top U.S. public health agency said that coronavirus can spread greater distances through the air than 6 feet, particularly in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces. But agency officials continued to say such spread is uncommon, and current social distancing guidelines still make sense. (NIAID-RML via AP)
COVID at a glance for Thursday, Jan. 21

The most recent state and local numbers.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy addresses the public during a virtual town hall on Sept. 15, 2020 in Alaska. ( Courtesy Photo / Austin McDaniel, Office of the Governor)
Dunleavy pitches dividend change amid legislative splits

No clear direction has emerged from lawmakers.

Joar Leifseth Ulsom, right, wearing a bib with ExxonMobil lettering on it, congratulates Peter Kaiser on his win in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska. The world’s most famous sled dog race has lost another major sponsor as the Iditarod prepares for a scaled-back version of this year’s race because of the pandemic, officials said Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021. ExxonMobil confirmed to The Associated Press that the oil giant will drop its sponsorship of the race. (Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News)
ExxonMobil becomes latest sponsor to sever Iditarod ties

The world’s most famous sled dog race has lost another major sponsor.

Has it always been a police car? (Michael Penn / Juneau Empire)
Police calls for Friday, Jan. 22, 2021

This report contains public information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

This electron microscope image made available and color-enhanced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Integrated Research Facility in Fort Detrick, Md., shows Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, orange, isolated from a patient.	(THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-NIAID/National Institutes of Health)
State reports 24 COVID-19 deaths

Only 1 of the deaths happened recently, according to the state.

Most Read