People sit outside the Juneau Arts & Culture Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15. The JACC is poised to serve as an emergency warming shelter through the first quarter of next year. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

People sit outside the Juneau Arts & Culture Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15. The JACC is poised to serve as an emergency warming shelter through the first quarter of next year. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

City decides to keep emergency warming shelter where it is

Location extended to mid-April 2021.

The Juneau Arts and Culture Center will continue to provide a home for Juneau’s warming shelter, run by the St. Vincent de Paul Society.

The City and Borough of Juneau Assembly Committee of the Whole considered other options downtown including the Bill Ray Center and a warehouse, among others. However, Assembly members ultimately settled not purchasing a new building and sticking with the building already proven capable of hosting 70 clients.

“The fact that we’re gonna be there for the next eight months at least has given us some certainty,” said Dave Ringle, St. Vincent de Paul Juneau’s general manager, in a phone interview. “I’m comfortable with the services we’re offering between 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.”

With the warming shelter stabilized at the JACC, SVDP is able to set up longer contracts and consider improving parts of infrastructure, Ringle said, like lockers for client’s possessions and other changes to improve safety and quality of life. But while the JACC is an adequate shelter during the evening hours, Ringle said, the days are another matter.

[City awaits results from hundreds of COVID-19 tests]

“I feel very fortunate that we were able to move the warming shelter into the JACC on a week’s notice,” Ringle said. “The needs have not changed. The need to provide some place for people to go during the day when they have nowhere else to go is going to become much more critical in one more month.”

City and Borough of Juneau Assembly’s Committee of the Whole voted that the Juneau Arts and Culture Center will remain Juneau’s designated warming shelter until April 15, 2021 in a meeting Sept. 14, 2020. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

City and Borough of Juneau Assembly’s Committee of the Whole voted that the Juneau Arts and Culture Center will remain Juneau’s designated warming shelter until April 15, 2021 in a meeting Sept. 14, 2020. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

Nevertheless, Ringle said, he hoped that the future would hold more permanent solutions for housing for people experiencing homelessness. The current situation is daunting, Ringle said. Dipping temperatures and other factors, such as harassment of residents of the Thane campground by bears, are pushing more people to the shelter, Ringle said.

“We have a much better idea of the needs of warming shelter clients than we did two and three years ago,” Ringle said, as a data management system has helped assist collecting that information. “The Juneau Coalition on Housing and Homelessness would like to have a plan in place to get more people in housing rather than shelter.”

Programs to help residents experiencing homelessness into more permanent housing, such as Housing First, which just opened its second phase housing, are hampered by COVID increasing the difficulty of obtaining necessary paperwork, Ringle said.

“Getting a social security card in COVID times is a lot harder than in normal times,” Ringle said. “The people in the shelter are barely hanging on in the best of times. It’s a tough situation.”

There are roughly 60 living spaces available between the first and second phases, Juneau City Manager Rorie Watt said during a phone interview, with no current plans to construct more.

“From the city’s perspective, it’s always a question of the unsheltered population — is it growing? Is it not growing?” Watt said. “Everyone on the Assembly got on board to do something to help.”

• Contact reporter Michael S. Lockett at 757-621-1197 or mlockett@juneauempire.com.

More in News

Folks at the Alaska State Capitol openly admit to plenty of fish tales, but to a large degree in ways intended to benefit residents and sometimes even the fish. (Mark Sabbatini / Juneau Empire)
The bizarre bills other state legislatures are considering

Alaska’s Legislature isn’t mulling the headline-grabbers some statehouses have in the works.

This photo shows snow-covered hills in the Porcupine River Tundra in the Yukon Territories, Canada. In July 1997, a hunter contacted troopers in Fairbanks, Alaska, and reported finding a human skull along the Porcupine River, around 8 miles (13 kilometers) from the Canadian border. Investigators used genetic genealogy to help identify the remains as those of Gary Frank Sotherden, according to a statement Thursday, Feb. 2, 2023, from Alaska State Troopers. (AP Photo / Rick Bowmer)
Skull found in ‘97 in Interior belongs to New York man

A skull found in a remote part of Alaska’s Interior in 1997… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police calls for Saturday, Feb. 4, 2023

This report contains information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Officer William Hicks stands with JPD Chief Ed Mercer and Deputy Chief David Campbell during a swearing in ceremony for Hicks on Thursday at the JPD station in Lemon Creek. (Jonson Kuhn / Juneau Empire)
New officer joins JPD’s ranks

The Juneau Police Department welcomed a new officer to its ranks Thursday… Continue reading

These photos show Nova, a 3-year-old golden retriever, and the illegally placed body hold trap, commonly referred to as a Conibear trap, that caught her while walking near Outer Point Trail last week. (Courtesy / Jessica Davis)
Dog narrowly survives rare illegally placed trap in Juneau

State wildlife officials outlined what to do if found in similar situation

Gavel (Courtesy photo)
Public defender agency to refuse some cases, citing staffing

ANCHORAGE — A state agency that represents Alaskans who cannot afford their… Continue reading

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police: Gift card scam connected to hoax Fred Meyer threats

This article has been moved in front of the Empire’s paywall. A… Continue reading

This is a concept design drawing that was included in the request for proposal sent out by the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities seeking outside engineering and design services to determine whether it’s feasible to build a new ferry terminal facility in Juneau at Cascade Point. (Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities)
DOT takes steps toward potential Cascade Point ferry terminal facility

It would accommodate the Tazlina and or Hubbard, shorten trips to Haines and Skagway

(Michael Penn / Juneau Empire File)
Police calls for Friday, Feb. 3, 2023

This report contains information from law enforcement and public safety agencies.

Most Read