Stock image.

Stock image.

What’s Happening the week of June 27-July 3

Support for Families Dealing with Addiction: Heroin and Opiates, Wednesday, June 27, 5:30-7 p.m., NCADD, 211 4th St. suite 100. Family support for parents and family members of people struggling with heroin and other opiate use. Free support group. Led by parents. No need to register. Confidential space. Information, education and resources will be provided.

Author talk: Daniel Lee Henry, Thursday, June 28, 5:30-7 p.m., Alaska State Museum. Join author Daniel Lee Henry for a conversation about his new book “Across the Shaman’s River: John Muir, the Tlingit Stronghold, and the Opening of the North.” The book explores Muir’s impact on Alaska and its people. It builds from Muir’s unpublished journals and the author’s interviews with 16 Tlingit elders to reveal a profound intercultural dynamic rarely seen in American history writing. Free.

Think Like a Computer: An Introduction to Coding, Thursday, June 28, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Mendenhall Valley Public Library. This monthly class introduces a different concept to coding each time. For ages eight to adult.

Arlo Guthrie concert, Friday, June 29, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Centennial Hall. Tickets can be purchased through the Juneau Arts and Humanities Council, Hearthside Books, and Juneau Jazz & Classics. Learn more about the concert at www.jazzandclassics.org.

Summer Block Party: Susu and the Prophets, Friday, June 29, 5:30-7 p.m., Centennial Hall courtyard.

Friday Night Concert Series, June 29, 8-10 p.m., Alaska Fish & Chips Company, 2 Marine Way #124. Twenty straight weeks of live music. Lineup to be announced at www.alaskafishandchips.com.

Fabulous Family Fun Festival, Saturday, June 30, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., Dimond Fieldhouse. A family oriented event featuring a bouncy house, shaved ice, dancing, face painting, carnival games, juggling, crafts, a book walk and more. All proceeds go to support Family Promise of Juneau, a program that serves children and their families who are experiencing homelessness. Costs $20 per family. Tickets available through Family Promise staff and volunteers.

Families Belong Together Rally, Saturday, June 30, 10 a.m., Capitol School Park. Marches and rallies will be held nationwide to voice dissent regarding the separation of children from their families, and the detention of families along the U.S./Mexico border. Featured speakers in Juneau will be Ernestine Hayes and Tasha Elizarde. After the rally the League of Women Voters Juneau will provide materials to register to vote. This is a non-partisan event which will also serve as a fundraiser for the Alaska Institute for Justice.

4th of July concert, Saturday, June 30, 7 p.m., Thunder Mountain High School. Taku Winds and the Juneau Volunteer Marching Band present a concert of American Band music to celebrate the U.S.’s birthday. The combined ensembles are conducted by William Todd Hunt. Tickets are $20 for adults and $5 for students.

Broken Walls concert, Monday, July 2 and Tuesday, July 3, 7 p.m., Juneau Revival Center, 9397 La Perouse Ave. Hosting is Carry the Cure, a suicide prevention program. Broken Walls is a musical group blending Pow-Wow music with rock music, funk, and world music for an inspirational message. Free. For more information, call 957-6664.

Clinton Fearon concert, Tuesday, July 3, 7:30-11 p.m., Pier 49, 406 S. Franklin St. suite 102. Clinton Fearon and the Boogie Brown Band are coming to Juneau this summer for an open-air concert. Pier 49 has new heaters and retractable patio cover so the show will go on rain or shine. Tickets at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center, Hearthside Books, and www.jahc.org. Costs $25.

AROUND SOUTHEAST

Haines – Patriotic Trumpet Concert, Saturday, June 30, 6 p.m., Legion Hall. Admittance by donation.

Sitka – Cafe Concert, Wednesday, June 27, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Mean Queen. The Sitka Summer Music Festival presents a free cafe concert. For more information, go to sitkamusicfestival.org.

Sitka – Concert, Thursday, June 28, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Harrigan Centennial Hall. Violinist Helen Kim, Allison Bailey, cellists Zuill Bailey and Cicely Parnas, violist Jenny Douglass and pianist Yulia Gorneman perform Bach and Schumann. Tickets are $25 general admission, $20 for senior citizens and military and $15 for students at Old Harbor Books, online and the door. A pre-concert conversation with Susan Reed is 6:45 p.m. and a reception follows the music.

Sitka – Final concert, Friday, June 29, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Harrigan Centennial Hall. Featured are violinists Helen Kim and Allison Bailey, cellists Zuill Bailey and Cicely Parnas, violists Martin Sher and Jenny Douglass and pianist Yulia Gorenman. Tickets are $25 general admission, $20 for senior citizens and military and $15 for students at Old Harbor Books, online and the door. A pre-concert conversation with Susan Reed is 6:45 p.m. and a reception follows the music.

Sitka – Jazz on the Waterfront, Saturday, June 30, 7-10 p.m., Odess Theater. Dinner and live musical entertainment by the Sitka Fine Arts Camp Big Band are included. Tickets are $65 at Old Harbor Books or by calling 747-3085

Yakutat – Yakutat Family Fishing Day, Saturday, June 30, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Yakutat small boat harbor. Fishing rods are provided. Activities include a barbeque, casting contest, fish prints, and face painting. For more information, contact Nate Catterson or Lisa Byers at 907-784-3359.

Ketchikan – Fellowship of the Pen, Wednesday, June 27, 3-7:30 p.m., Ketchikan Public Library. Fellowship of the Pen is an open-to-everyone, come-and-go-as-you-please writing community supported by the Ketchikan Public Library through hosting Drop-In Writing Sessions, feedback workshops, special community events, programs, and presentations. If you would like more information, drop in to any session/event or contact us at 225-3331.

Ketchikan – Film screening: “Uprivers,” Saturday, June 30, 4:30-6 p.m., Ketchikan Public Library. This documentary is about the potential impact of Canadian mining projects on Southeast Alaska watersheds. There will be a Q&A session with filmmaker Matt Jackson following the movie.

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