Thnak you letter for June 21, 2020

Thank you, merci, danke, gracias, gunalchéesh.

Thank you to everyone who helped to make our virtual Celebration 2020 happen. Because of the pandemic, for the first time we switched from an in-person event, which we have held biennially for nearly 40 years, to a virtual platform.

We had hoped to come together, virtually and spiritually, and by all accounts, that happened. But we could not have accomplished that without the more than 540 people who contributed new photos and videos to the broadcast. They made it possible for Sealaska Heritage to feature a 2020 Juried Art Show, an Indigenous Fashion Show, a Toddler Regalia Review and a Native Artist Market. People also sent videos of storytelling, which became a popular associated event never before featured.

[Longtime teacher and photohjournalist each earn awards]

Thank you to major donor Sealaska and all of our generous sponsors, including the City and Borough of Juneau; to dance group leaders who sent greetings; to those who made memorial donations; to our moderators and storytellers; to the artists and jurors who participated in our Juried Art Show; to toddler regalia participants and their families; to the fashion show designers and models; and to everyone who sent in selfies and videos.

Thank you to the journalists who documented virtual Celebration; to web designers Hayden and Anna Hoke for producing our online art exhibit and photo galleries; and to KTOO, especially Mikko Wilson, for guiding the production. The entire program is available on YouTube and exhibits and galleries are at celebration.sealaskaheritage.org.

We are grateful to you all.

Rosita Worl,

Sealaska Heritage Institute President

Thanks from The Learning Connection

The Learning Connection at Southeast Regional Resource Center would like to offer a heartfelt thank you to the local organizations that have helped make our work possible. The mission of TLC is helping people build a better life through education. Adult learners in Juneau seek out TLC for a variety of reasons including GED prep and testing, English language development, college admission prep, and vocational training. In order to meet this wide range of needs, TLC relies on the generous sponsorship of community partners.

With the help of The Juneau Community Foundation, TLC is able to fund GED test examiners, adult education instructors, a volunteer coordinator, and career navigation services. Through JCF, the Douglas-Dornan Foundation Fund also provides financial assistance for GED examinations for students in need. TLC and its GED services provide value to the community of Juneau by assisting people attain skills needed for employment and general quality of life.

Additionally, community support allows for the service of an AmeriCorps member whose purpose is to recruit and retain students in our programs. This position is funded by the Juneau Community Foundation, Coeur-Alaska Kensington Mine, and Hecla Greens Creek Mine. Recruitment and retention is especially important in the time of COVID-19, where our physical learning spaces are closed and students are continuing their learning through distance options.

On behalf of TLC, SERRC, and all the students that benefit from this community support, thank you again to the Juneau Community Foundation, the Douglas-Dornan Foundation Fund, Coeur-Alaska Kensington Mine, and Hecla Greens Creek Mine.

With sincere appreciation,

Staff and Students at The Learning Connection

More in Neighbors

Columnist Geoff Kirsch says ramen is the superior hyper-preserved food stuff when compared to Twinkies. “Also, it’ll make the post-apocalypse seem like you’re back in college, especially if you’re listening sitting under a black light and listening to “’Dark Side of the Moon,’” he writes. (Tom & Nicole Moore / Paxaby)
Slack Tide: Doomsday cramming

I can clearly see I’m not doomsday prepped at all. In fact, I’m doomsday screwed.

Living & Growing: It’s time for a new season

There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under heaven

Gimme a Smile: Quarantine TV

I’ve been watching a lot of TV lately. I’m guessing I’m not the only one.

Thank you letter for Sept. 20, 2020

Thank you, merci, danke, gracias, gunalchéesh.

Living & Growing: We belong to the human family

When we frame life as “us” and “them,” we deny ourselves growth and celebration of God-given diversity.

Courtesy photo / Tom Dawson
                                From left to right, Kirk Thorsteinson, Tom Dawson, Howard Colbert, and Tim Armstrong gather for Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Recognition Day at the American Legion Post in Juneau. The holiday us held on the third Friday of every September to remember the more than 81,900 missing American service members.
American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars gather for POW/MIA Recognition Day

More than 81,900 Americans never returned from our many wars.

EcoChaplain Roger Wharton is an Episcopal priest from Juneau. (Courtesy Photo / Roger Wharton)
Living & Growing: The Great Commandment — an ecological perspective

To love God is to live a simple life that is as ecologically sound as possible.

Ode to a Dead Salmon

“That’s the other way you know summer’s almost over in Juneau, even a COVID-19 summer: dead salmon.”

Recognitions for Sept. 13

Juneau has a National Merit Scholarship semifinalist

Thank you letters for Sept. 13

Thank you, merci, danke, gracias, gunalchéesh.

Living & Growing: The benefits of being slow to anger

Whoever will seek to be a peacemaker in the days ahead will be blessed.

This photo shows Marla Berg, member of the 100 Women Who Care coordinator team, and Joy Lyon, Executive Director of AEYC Southeast Alaska. (Courtesy Photo / Iola Young)
Thanks a million to the 100 Women Who Care Juneau

“Our hearts are overflowing with gratitude!”