Jocelyn Miles performs during the 2016 Juneau’s Got Talent contest. Miles would go on to win. Auditions for the 2019 contest will be Dec. 17 and Dec. 18. (Diane Antaya | Courtesy photo for Juneau Dance Theatre)

Jocelyn Miles performs during the 2016 Juneau’s Got Talent contest. Miles would go on to win. Auditions for the 2019 contest will be Dec. 17 and Dec. 18. (Diane Antaya | Courtesy photo for Juneau Dance Theatre)

Any jugglers or sword swallowers out there?

Juneau’s Got Talent hopes for variety of acts, try out on Dec. 17 or 18

Got talent and want $500?

Auditions for the fourth annual Juneau’s Got Talent contest are 5-7:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17 and Tuesday, Dec. 18 at Juneau Dance Theatre, and are the first step toward a possible payday.

“We really want variety,” said Juneau Dance Theatre Executive Director Bridget Lujan. “We loved it that we had a clown audition last year. We loved that we had a jump roper our first year. We want to know where are our jugglers, where are our sword swallowers.”

Lujan said the show is open to talent of all age groups, but the Feb. 9 show will have an adult atmosphere and a bar. She also emphasized the contest is not restricted to amateur artist.

“We want a high-quality show,” Lujan said. “If you’re a professional artist, you can still come play.”

A two-day audition process is part of an attempt to mine a wider vein of talent. Auditioners can register online at juneaudance.org/juneaus-got-talent/. There is a $20 registration fee.

Lujan said participants won’t need to spend the entirety of their night at auditions, after registering a roughly 10-minute audition window is set up.

After auditions, Lujan said about a dozen finalists, who will perform in the show, will be announced just before Christmas. While there is not a cap placed on the number of finalists, Lujan said time means there is unlikely to be more than 15.

“We don’t want it to be an all-night affair,” Lujan said.

Once finalists are chosen, Lujan said there will be a couple of rehearsals and a technical rehearsal ahead of the actual show.

During the show, contestants will be judged by a handful of local personalities, and audience members will be able to vote with their money.

Funds raised will go toward Juneau Dance Theatre.

In each of the past three years, Lujan said a different sort of performer has taken the top spot.

“Our first winner was a vocalist, the next year was an electric violinist, then it was a dance duo,” Lujan said. “That was unintentional. That’s just how it worked out. We are hoping for that variety.”


• Contact arts and culture reporter Ben Hohenstatt at 523-2243 or bhohenstatt@juneauempire.com.


Jocelyn Miles performs during the 2016 Juneau’s Got Talent contest. Miles would go on to win. Auditions for the 2019 contest will be Dec. 17 and Dec. 18. (Diane Antaya | Courtesy photo for Juneau Dance Theatre)

Jocelyn Miles performs during the 2016 Juneau’s Got Talent contest. Miles would go on to win. Auditions for the 2019 contest will be Dec. 17 and Dec. 18. (Diane Antaya | Courtesy photo for Juneau Dance Theatre)

Eric Oravsky and Meredith Walls dance during Juneau’s Got Talent 2016. Bridget Lujan, Executive Director for Juneau Dance Theatre, said its hoped a variety of acts will try out this year during Dec. 17 and Dec. 18 auditions. (Diane Antaya | Courtesy photo for Juneau Dance Theatre)

Eric Oravsky and Meredith Walls dance during Juneau’s Got Talent 2016. Bridget Lujan, Executive Director for Juneau Dance Theatre, said its hoped a variety of acts will try out this year during Dec. 17 and Dec. 18 auditions. (Diane Antaya | Courtesy photo for Juneau Dance Theatre)

Lydia Smith performs a musical theater number during Juneau’s Got Talent 2016. (Diane Antaya | Courtesy photo for Juneau Dance Theatre)

Lydia Smith performs a musical theater number during Juneau’s Got Talent 2016. (Diane Antaya | Courtesy photo for Juneau Dance Theatre)

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